jmyers

Future decline in demand for designers/draftspersons?

Recommended Posts

With the increase in government regulations and design requirements from the building departments, what does everyone think about the future of the small 1-5 person shop that does residential drafting/design for builders and homeowners? Will we soon see a day where all single family dwelling building plans for permit application will have to be produced by licensed engineers or architects? I'm sure it is getting close to this in some parts of the country. I'm in the Midwest and it isn't there yet, but I wonder if it will be in the future.

  • Upvote 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I am not feeling it yet in California. If I am not feeling it here then you are just fine. What I do feel is the need to be better and better at my job. What the regulations do is weed out the less competent. If you are good, can learn and grow with the times then you are able to sustain.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

It's already here in southern cal. Today the plan checker wanted a detail of a non-bearing wall, getting worse every day.

The California green codes are everywhere around here, most cities don't even know what it is, yet they want pages of notes

on every plan. I'm not a landscaper, I guess I'll now have to hire a landscape Architect for everything.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

As software is becoming more and more "automated" I think things have to go this way - and I hope it does.  WAY too many pretenders who view the software as "the business" and think they can BS their way through a set of plans.

 

We need more restrictions IMO while also grandfathering in existing designers in some fashion.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I think the less competent the plan checker the more they want.  Thankfully the government doesn't have many incompetent employees.......yeah right ;o)

  • Upvote 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The less free market, the more homogenized housing will become... ie, soviet style housing projects, IMHO.

  • Upvote 1
  • Downvote 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The less free market, the more homogenized housing will become... ie, soviet style housing projects, IMHO.

Id say the opposite. The more professionals doing the design the better housing will become (and no, I am not just talking architects). I see too many hideous new homes that reinforce that belief.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Any examples to back up your gratuitous assertion that more licenses, rules and regulations will lead to more creativity?

  • Upvote 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

... they can BS their way through a set of plans.

...I've been BSing my way through plans for 15 years.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Getting plans through the city planners these days in California is indeed a daunting and crazy making task. Somewhere in that crazy is more opportunity if you can find it. The more difficult the task the more expertise required. The more expertise required the more money can be charged. The hard part is staying sane through the crazy process.

 

And yes here in California we are already required to have licensed engineers sign off on most projects but the 'designer' does not have to be licensed - yet.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

There are many professional designers (architects, engineers, designers, etc.) that do not prepare plans themselves. They design, and have a team of drafts-persons to prepare the plans.

 

Many times, and I'm speaking from first hand knowledge, that drafts-person not only is not in their office, but maybe even not in their state. 

 

If you know how to put together a solid set of plans, and have good/great communication skills, you have employment opportunities.....bad plan checker and over regulation aside.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Quite a few years ago, the Architects in B.C. tried to shut down the home designers. There was quite a bit of tension and negotiation but it didn't happen. I didn't get too involved and then moved to another province but it would be interesting to hear from anyone there that was actively involved in the issue.

I worked for an Engineer for quite a while doing all the structural details and corrections for many architects and designers plans. This was a great education and I can honestly say there were good, bad and ugly in both camps both in style and ability.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

...I've been BSing my way through plans for 15 years.

I have also been BSing for over 40 years.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Quite a few years ago, the Architects in B.C. tried to shut down the home designers. There was quite a bit of tension and negotiation but it didn't happen. I didn't get too involved and then moved to another province but it would be interesting to hear from anyone there that was actively involved in the issue.

I worked for an Engineer for quite a while doing all the structural details and corrections for many architects and designers plans. This was a great education and I can honestly say there were good, bad and ugly in both camps both in style and ability.

Years ago they tried that in California, so what did they do, they grandfathered all designers that joined  a designers group,(money only --no test) to licensed Architects ,in hopes of getting rid of Designers. Didn't work.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Id say the opposite. The more professionals doing the design the better housing will become (and no, I am not just talking architects). I see too many hideous new homes that reinforce that belief.

"Professional" just means government control...less is more when it comes to regulation by so called experts. Where I live the "professional" builders and their "professionals" designers are ruining the landscape. Nothing but "Stepford" houses...all the same. Yuk.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Nothing but "Stepford" houses...all the same. Yuk. 

 

Yes. Greater Indianapolis...aka the land of beige boxes.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I think its more about what the general populous can afford, rather than the design of any home. everything is really about money after all.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Here in NY, all pages of permit set must be reviewed/stamped by architect or engineer

 

I did two projects here in NY, my sisters addition and my addition

 

both times the "professional" made major mistakes

 

for my addition it could have cost me $2k+ but my partner questioned the need for an lvl ridge beam

with king studs to hold it etc

 

he said with the collar ties it shouldn't be needed

 

I contacted the architect and she says "whoops, I didn't notice the collar ties", "no lvl needed" :(

 

for my sister's addition - the engineer made 14 mistakes

 

luckily all were caught before plan submission

 

my partner and I had 100% success rate in plan submission

 

Lew

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I don't think life works by general rules about anything.

 

I have met the worst craftsmen ever who ran great businesses, and I've met great craftsmen who ran the worst businesses.

 

I've seen great designers who find ways to offend almost every client, and mediocre designers who have a trail of countless happy customers.

 

'Professionals' who are the worst people to work for and with, and pickup truck napkin sketchers who create fabulous stuff.

 

Each of those people find the clients that match and no matter which regulation comes along those people and their matching clients will find each other.

 

It's always worked that way and always will.

 

I moved back to California with a $200 Chevy Malibu with a green vinyl landau roof that I drove from Washington state in 1988. No money, no license, no training, absolutely no experience in my next adventure. All I had was a passion for plants and landscaping. I started a landscape company solely based on that passion. I had no idea I was doing it wrong and people loved my passion and my designs and skills and I simply ignored the fact I shouldn't be doing what I was doing without licenses etc.

 

That meager beginning brought me and everyone here, by the same means, to where they are today.

 

They change the rules? So what - adapt. Some people need a 'professional' licensed someone to take care of their designs. Some people don't want licensed professional people anywhere near them. There's an a$$ for every seat and a client for everyone who takes their commitments and agreements seriously and who has even the slightest passion for what they do.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Yes. Greater Indianapolis...aka the land of beige boxes.

 

 

Yes...and also the "Stepford Craftsman" has taken over every subdivision.  It appears that "good design" is determined by how little masonry is installed on the house.  

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Years ago they tried that in California, so what did they do, they grandfathered all designers that joined  a designers group,(money only --no test) to licensed Architects ,in hopes of getting rid of Designers. Didn't work.

Geez, Perry, where do you come up with this garbage? The California Board of Architectural Examiners (as it was called back then) had a category of license called "Registered Building Designer" from 1964-1985. They eliminated this category in 1986, offering the existing Registered Building Designers the one-time opportunity to "upgrade" to the architect category. Only about 300 of the approximately 700 active registered designers took them up on this. Yep, pretty nefarious plot all right. (rolling eyes...)

  • Upvote 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Any examples to back up your gratuitous assertion that more licenses, rules and regulations will lead to more creativity?

 

Do you want me to email you the myriads upon myriads of pictures I could use as examples..?  I see way more crap design than I do good design...and yes, I do believe that is based upon lax regulation on who should be designing structures.

 

Id say its more an exception than the rule to see non-architects who know what they are truly doing.  To me it feels like back in the 90's where the transition from "Graphic Designer" to anyone with MS Publisher could call themselves one.  Software is making it too easy to BS....

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Any examples to back up your gratuitous assertion that more licenses, rules and regulations will lead to more creativity?

Maybe your next door neighbor will build something like this, and you will start to appreciate some regulation.post-214-0-54064200-1472076190_thumb.jpg

Or maybe this....post-214-0-89898800-1472076653_thumb.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

FWIW, Regulations don't cause good design.  They can prevent unsafe construction and for the most part result in better buildings.  That doesn't by any stretch of the imagination mean all regulations are good.  Some regulations simply add to the cost without really providing any benefit.

 

Even in covenant communities where there are design restrictions and review boards - sometimes the design is faulty even if the appearance is compatible with the community standards.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Please sign in to comment

You will be able to leave a comment after signing in



Sign In Now

  • Member Statistics

    27474
    Total Members
    6254
    Most Online
    Chieftan08
    Newest Member
    Chieftan08
    Joined