Roof Issues


Designer100
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Can anyone help me with this roof? You cannot use automatic roof etc. I have been messing with this for 4 hours trying to fix this roof. front to back is 8:12 and sides 10:12 and some sides 8:12.

It says to large to upload? what can I do?

Thanks

 

for any help.

 

 

chief architect x7

 

713.385.3622

newell.cheatheam@gmail.com 

Luedeker 3.zip

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The problem is that your geometry will not allow the roof planes to meet.

The one area that is a problem is the roof over Bath 3 and the Attic. 

If you want to retain the existing roof pitches, you need to reduce the ceiling height in those 2 rooms to 238". 

This will then allow the lower roof to build over those 2 rooms as a single plane.

 

The roofs CAN be built automatically - very easy.

 

Is this what you are after?

post-106-0-03173700-1450149628_thumb.jpg

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Here is the fixed plan with auto build roofs.

Apart from the problem with the ceiling heights at the rear of level 2, there were 2 roof pitches defined for the gable behind the chimney.

You will need to fix up the columns in the front porch.

If you don't want to drop the ceiling heights in the bath and attic, you will need to increase the pitch or height of the roofs coming up from the rear of the ground floor (if you want the upper and lower roofs to be coplanar).

Luedeker 3 fixed by Glenn (2).zip

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Glenn, YOU never cease to amaze me!

I know, and with one hand tied behind his back on.................. gasp...................... imperial plans. That alone is worth an award. I love metric, and wish we would finally switch.

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There's really nothing to learn. Everything is divisible by 10. And 1000sf is roughly 100sm. I did my first metric job a few years ago in Bangkok for a friend. It was a 230sm renovation of a condo. There wasn't any learning curve whatsoever.

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There's really nothing to learn. Everything is divisible by 10. And 1000sf is roughly 100sm. I did my first metric job a few years ago in Bangkok for a friend. It was a 230sm renovation of a condo. There wasn't any learning curve whatsoever.

Agreed,

 

I too thought it would be hard to learn, but there really was no learning curve at all. Very simple, never deal with fractions, and so much easier than imperial.

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That's the beauty. There are no fractions. Just meters, centimeters, and millimeters. All divisible by 10.

 

In Oz, we don't even use centimeters, just meters and millimeters, but mostly just millimeters.

The only difference really is where the decimal point goes.

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In Oz, we don't even use centimeters, just meters and millimeters, but mostly just millimeters.

The only difference really is where the decimal point goes.

Yeah, in metric plans I've done, I simply just use mm (other than site stuff where meters are easier with smaller numbers). No thinking involved, no math, no calculators, no fractions, just easy.

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That's a nice wish but be careful what you wish for.  It would cause a lot of teeth gnashing when trying to do a remodel in the USA.  All of our existing construction is based on 12" increments.  (304.8 mm) which would be a b****h to work with.  A meter is a nice module but I think (I could be wrong) most metric sheet goods are 1200x2400 mm (just under 4'x8').  Maybe it's 1220x2440 which is just over 4'x8'.  IAE, it's not really as simple as just changing the units.  Lots of manufacturing would have to be changed an a lot of old guys would need their brains re-wired.

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Chief makes working in both formats easy - especially for dimensions.

You can choose to show both metric and imperial units by using the Secondary Format.

Or you can change the default Format between Metric and Imperial.

This means that you can draw a plan in imperial and then change the default format to metric and all the dimensions will change to metric - how easy is that!

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Australia changed to decimal currency back in 1966 and 1971 for measurements.

What...Oz can do it, but the US can't!

 

Just to keep things consistent, maybe you should go the other way and go completely imperial and use Imperial pounds, shillings and pence for your currency!

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They tried changing the gas pumps to liters (or was

that litres?) here a while back. I think it lasted about

six months. It's not that we can't change to metric 

but rather we don't want to change. Besides Imperial

has a nice ring to it.

 

Heck, you metric guys are so screwed up you probably

only get 10 eggs in a dozen.  :P

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