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Pyramid shaped chimney cap

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How would you make the pyramid shaped chimney cap shown in the attachment?  Would you use the pyramid tool...then subtract from it using other solids and create the shape?  I've tried with the solids...and made a little progress but nothing looks quite right.  Also...working with solids is tedious. 

 

Any suggestions would be welcome. 

 

 

post-227-0-86828700-1466452450_thumb.png

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Pyramid Tool - Truncated

 

Unless I'm missing something...(most likely)...the pyramid tool only allows for equal sides.  Typically a chimney cap is rectangular.  The one I was trying to make is roughly 50"x32"...with a 10x10 flat spot in the center.

I guess you could make the pyramid, truncate it, then turn it into a symbol with correct stretch zones?  Am I on the right track?

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Steve,

 

That's a different problem.  I would use some PSolids drawn in elevations as a starting point.  Then use the Solid Addition/Subtraction Tools in a perspective view.

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How about a molding line? Just create your own profile for the cap.

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How about a molding line? Just create your own profile for the cap.

It won't work.  Steve wants a 50"x32" base and a 10"x10" cap.

That means the sides are at different angles so the molding profile isn't going to work.

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EDIT: Just noticed the square cap, so this won't work.

 

Used the pyramid tool to create a truncated square of the correct shape.

 

Copy / Paste in Place. Drag the second out to form a rectangle.

 

Solid Intersection.

 

Add a solid for the lower part.

 

post-1284-0-93282700-1466464464_thumb.jpg

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Could be done turning into symbols in two generations, one with stretch zone left, stretch 9"-convert to symbol. Set stretch zone on the right for second symbol, stretch again.

Have used this, symbol generations idea a few times recently.

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Steve,

 

That's a different problem.  I would use some PSolids drawn in elevations as a starting point.  Then use the Solid Addition/Subtraction Tools in a perspective view.

 

Yep.  This is what I would do as well.  Could be done in just a couple minutes.  I originally answered that a molding polyline was probably the easiest but deleted my answer almost immediately once I realized the shape wasn't the same on all sides. 

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I actually took the original suggestion...use a pyramid and truncated...added a "box" solid to the bottom to give it some depth.  Voila!  

It works well enough...if I could figure out how to use the stretch zones it might work better.  As it is...the chimney cap distorts as you change the size of the cap.  But...it's good enough for what I need at the moment. 

 

 

post-227-0-55265100-1466477333_thumb.png

post-227-0-74028900-1466477344_thumb.png

Chimney Cap.calibz

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Looks great.

 

I was going to suggest making this thing by using the roof tool, using uneven hips, 1 inch thick rafters (no ridge caps and no gutters of course)

 

Place the flue pipe ontop, and convert the whole thing into a symbol.

 

You got it though. Nicely done.

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Looks great.

I was going to suggest making this thing by using the roof tool, using uneven hips, 1 inch thick rafters (no ridge caps and no gutters of course)

Place the flue pipe ontop, and convert the whole thing into a symbol.

You got it though. Nicely done.

I like this idea. I will give it a try. Thanks.

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Looks great.

I was going to suggest making this thing by using the roof tool, using uneven hips, 1 inch thick rafters (no ridge caps and no gutters of course)

Place the flue pipe ontop, and convert the whole thing into a symbol.

You got it though. Nicely done.

There you go. Using rood planes is probably the easiest method. Great idea Val!

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Thank you. :)

 

At the risk of sounding like one of those power users who makes up work-arounds, the program can make pretty much any shape you can think of.

 

I still don't what a Ruby is though, so I guess I'm safe.

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Thank you. :)

 

At the risk of sounding like one of those power users who makes up work-arounds, the program can make pretty much any shape you can think of.

 

I still don't what a Ruby is though, so I guess I'm safe.

Val,

 

A Ruby is a red gemstone.  But in Chief Ruby is a scripting language that CA put in without everything needed to make it shine like a gem.

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Thank you. :)

 

At the risk of sounding like one of those power users who makes up work-arounds, the program can make pretty much any shape you can think of.

 

I still don't what a Ruby is though, so I guess I'm safe.

val nice one, only Dermot would take the risk, but just to help them see how great their product is. here is a new way that I can take the risk of modelling almost any shape that we may need in construction industry. this method is to be called the wireframe method. it makes use of 3d molding poly lines and chief's primitive tool. this enables us to model almost any shape.

here is a video on how to .....

https://youtu.be/SG26vbqyYXg

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val nice one, only Dermot would take the risk, but just to help them see how great their product is. here is a new way that I can take the risk of modelling almost any shape that we may need in construction industry. this method is to be called the wireframe method. it makes use of 3d molding poly lines and chief's primitive tool. this enables us to model almost any shape.

here is a video on how to .....

 

Yusef, 

 

I'm not sure when exactly I might use that technique, but you sir are a friggin' genius.  The sound quality on your video stinks (actually couldn't really hear it at all), but that's okay, your method is absolutely fantastic!!

 

I played around with it a bit and one thing I might add to the technique myself...

 

It looks like you were using molding polylines.  I might prefer to use additional faces, solids, or zero thickness polyline solids in a lot of situations (all of which snap quite nicely)...probably in conjunction with the glass house rendering technique.

 

Anyway, thank you Yusef.  That has to be my favorite tip in a very long time and I'm sure I'll probably be making use of it at some point.  Way to go my friend : )

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thanks all of you my friends, I am really happy, if that worked good.

Sorry about the sound, I will try to fix it.

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Yusef, Are the wire frames simple 1/16" - 1/8" molding p-lines set at different heights and shapes?

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Yusef, Are the wire frames simple 1/16" - 1/8" molding p-lines set at different heights and shapes?

 

I've spent a fair amount of time exploring the technique and although I can't answer for Yusef, I can tell you that it doesn't really matter what you use as a moulding because the snaps only recognize the line itself, so I would just make the moulding as small as possible.  The moldings themselves aren't really a necessity other than the fact you need to have them in order to see the line.  This is one reason using solids, additional faces, or zero thickness polyline solids have some benefits...there is no molding profile to contend with (albeit mostly just a minor visual annoyance).  That being said, using a 3D molding polyline has 2 benefits in that:

 

A.  You can easily see the wire frame (which you can also sort of do by using the other items I mentioned in glass house mode)...

 

But more importantly...

 

B.  The wire frame can be very easily manipulated and reshaped along all axis (i.e. you can very easily and independently move all its points freely through 3D space).

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