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How many of you guys go the extra mile, like myself, and include drawing the existing home with the addition. What i like to do is go to the site, take pics, take exterior measurements and return to the office and draw the whole thing with new addition. I delivered my client's plans and he thought i went overboard. First time i ever heard that, not to mention the price will remain the same so why not get a better product for your money? More is better in some situations, not to mention i think it makes it easier for the county to approve when they see a nice rendering of the overall project. I normally hatch out the existing home on the plan views but not in the elevations. What about you guys?

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One thing I forgot, i do not include any of the existing interior walls unless it ties into the addition somehow. I only draw the shell of the existing home with doors and windows.

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The "as-built" of the existing home is kind of a required element.  Most permit offices would not accept a plan that did not show this.  It also shows what the completed project would look like.

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6 minutes ago, javatom said:

The "as-built" of the existing home is kind of a required element.  Most permit offices would not accept a plan that did not show this.  It also shows what the completed project would look like.

Thanks! Exactly what i say. You cant just show one exterior wall that the addition ties into. Talk about incomplete and confusing as hell.

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1 hour ago, ChiefUserBigRob said:

You cant just show one exterior wall that the addition ties into. 

In cases where the permitting office allows it, this is exactly what I do in order to keep costs down. I do include a key plan and/or a site plan showing the location of the addition to avoid confusion.

But, like I said, in cases where my customers want to spend as little as possible, then I must draw as little as possible. Seems like a win, win. If they want to spend more, I'll happily oblige by modeling the entire as-built. Really depends on the client and their project / budget. My MO is not to spend my client's money unnecessarily. Obviously if they want to burn some cash, I'm quite happy to bring the gasoline!

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11 minutes ago, robdyck said:

In cases where the permitting office allows it, this is exactly what I do in order to keep costs down. I do include a key plan and/or a site plan showing the location of the addition to avoid confusion.

But, like I said, in cases where my customers want to spend as little as possible, then I must draw as little as possible. Seems like a win, win. If they want to spend more, I'll happily oblige by modeling the entire as-built. Really depends on the client and their project / budget. My MO is not to spend my client's money unnecessarily. Obviously if they want to burn some cash, I'm quite happy to bring the gasoline!

I charge by the addition square foot and site work so im actually adding more for free ONLY to make a better product and because chief is a speedy piece of software. I take pride in what i deliver and the whole project rendered looks awesome on the title sheet. Totally get your method too!

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1 minute ago, ChiefUserBigRob said:

I charge by the addition square foot and site work so im actually adding more for free ONLY to make a better product and because chief is a speedy piece of software. I take pride in what i deliver and the whole project rendered looks awesome on the title sheet. Totally get your method too!

On bigger projects, where the customer may be interested, I'll definitely let them know that I'm able to provide them with better visuals. But, for example, the last addition I just completed, was a 12x16 room added to a 1800 sq ft house. In that case, and with that client (who just needed an extra bedroom because of an expanding family) it's pretty tough to justify the time of a complete site measure plus the time to draw and model a complete house just for a small rectangular room. It probably would've taken 10 times longer, you know?

So in this case, it's not about showcasing my work or ability, or 'going the extra mile'. It's about listening to the client, understanding their situation and delivering just what they need (and hopefully leaving them some money for diapers). And by saving them as much as possible, they return the favor by word-of mouth referrals.

And, what some might call 'extra effort' for me is time stolen from my family, my friends, and most importantly...my bikes!

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About 95% of the time I draw the whole house, including interior walls.  Always do the exterior though, as I need the square footage numbers to know allowable square footage for the addition, walls in relation to setbacks, etc.  I might not draw the whole house interior if I'm just doing a kitchen remodel, for example, in which case I might just label the back end of the house "Bedrooms" and not show any interior walls except those connected to the immediate remodel area.  As was mentioned, drawing the interior walls is fairly quick and usually helps give the client context to see the whole thing.  I just tell the client that putting in the existing plan is part of the project set-up, which includes checking the local codes, getting site data, etc.  I've never had any client question me about it.

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It is a requirement for us to show complete before and after.

I model the as built then do a save as and start working on the alteration.

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And forgot to mention that I always ask the client if they have any floor plans from previous work done.  Then I use those to save time.  And if I do need to measure the whole house, I tell them they can help me if they want and reduce my time spent.  They are always happy to do that and I get to know them a bit better while we're walking around with the tape measure and they feel glad they are saving some money.

 

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16 minutes ago, Christina_Girerd said:

And forgot to mention that I always ask the client if they have any floor plans from previous work done.  Then I use those to save time.  And if I do need to measure the whole house, I tell them they can help me if they want and reduce my time spent.  They are always happy to do that and I get to know them a bit better while we're walking around with the tape measure and they feel glad they are saving some money.

 

I hear ya! Most homes i do additions for the owners arent the best house keepers and measuring around their clutter for interior wall dims would drive me nuts lol. I am not bashing anyone who doesnt keep a clean house by the way, just saying. 

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26 minutes ago, Christina_Girerd said:

 

I have debated quitting additions and focus primarily on new builds. But the additions keep me going. I really don't like them though. I do bang out some good work on them if i take them.

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1 hour ago, ChiefUserBigRob said:

I have debated quitting additions and focus primarily on new builds. But the additions keep me going. I really don't like them though. I do bang out some good work on them if i take them.

IMO additions create better margins. Existing is required for the most part in my municipalities/counties. An easy justification, " I need to verify existing conditions to better verify the structural mockup of your home" ...it's the same justification I give for taking a couple hundred pictures. So many instances where an addition turns into a kitchen remodel on the other side of the home.

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Almost all my work is additions/remodels.  Not so many new builds in our area since it is so built out already.  

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2 hours ago, robdyck said:

In cases where the permitting office allows it, this is exactly what I do in order to keep costs down. I do include a key plan and/or a site plan showing the location of the addition to avoid confusion.

But, like I said, in cases where my customers want to spend as little as possible, then I must draw as little as possible. Seems like a win, win. If they want to spend more, I'll happily oblige by modeling the entire as-built. Really depends on the client and their project / budget. My MO is not to spend my client's money unnecessarily. Obviously if they want to burn some cash, I'm quite happy to bring the gasoline!


I mostly concur.  Totally depends on the project and the nature/extent of the addition.  As a builder, one thing I’m hyper-aware of is that the more information I provide, the higher the possibility that we’ll raise extra concerns. I like to provide as little information as possible to get the job done properly.  Extra information typically only invites unnecessary complications.  

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1 hour ago, Renerabbitt said:

IMO additions create better margins. Existing is required for the most part in my municipalities/counties. An easy justification, " I need to verify existing conditions to better verify the structural mockup of your home" ...it's the same justification I give for taking a couple hundred pictures. So many instances where an addition turns into a kitchen remodel on the other side of the home.

This is very true. I did an addition to a vetrinary business. Once the owner moves the business into the addition he wants me to come back and tear down and layout new walls in the existing building. What's cool is he is working out of a model home and had the floorplan so i added the existing interior walls already in the plans i delivered to him. All I have to do is a save as to a new file and reconfigure walls. No clue how to even charge for that its so easy lol. 

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Around here, I have done over 4000 additions over 45+ years, and at least for 30  of those years  I have needed all  existing interior and exterior walls to be shown. I deal with about 50 cities so they vary in the amount of detail needed. A lot of the time we need to brace existing walls for earthquake. also we must show existing for all the energy requirements  also needed on every job.. Sounds like fun doesn't it?

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1 hour ago, DRAWZILLA said:

A lot of the time we need to brace existing walls for earthquake. also we must show existing for all the energy requirements  also needed on every job

Yep, same here in the S.F. bay area Perry... always need to show all of the existing walls, and not just that, but per your T-24 energy comment, need to measure all of the existing windows/ext. doors/skylights too.

BTW...Those of you talking about using tape measures... I highly recommend a small investment (~$50) in a laser measuring tool!   You'll be in love.  Very happy with the Skil rechargeable unit, but if you don't mind dealing with batteries Bosch is highly rated as well.  

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42 minutes ago, DzinEye said:

Yep, same here in the S.F. bay area Perry... always need to show all of the existing walls, and not just that, but per your T-24 energy comment, need to measure all of the existing windows/ext. doors/skylights too.

BTW...Those of you talking about using tape measures... I highly recommend a small investment (~$50) in a laser measuring tool!   You'll be in love.  Very happy with the Skil rechargeable unit, but if you don't mind dealing with batteries Bosch is highly rated as well.  

I have been pricing the laser measures. Dont you have to stick a target to the wall your shooting to (exterior walls).

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16 minutes ago, ChiefUserBigRob said:

Dont you have to stick a target to the wall your shooting to (exterior walls).

No. If you can handle listening to this guy, check out the video. This is what I use. Goes with me every where.

 

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