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Hello,

 

I am new to CA.

 

I got the HDP 2018 installed in my PC.

 

I wish to continue learning and practicing using the software, even remotely, so may I ask which is better to get PC or Mac laptop?

 

Thank you very much!

 

GL

 

 

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7 minutes ago, GreatLiving said:

I wish to continue learning and practicing using the software, even remotely, so may I ask which is better to get PC or Mac laptop?

 

What is "remotely"? Do you want to install the software on a laptop and just use a laptop like a laptop?

 

If you are comfortable with, and already own a PC, why would you consider a Mac?

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10 minutes ago, GreatLiving said:

I am new to CA.

 

It's really Home Designer, and those products have their own forum, HomeTalk.

 

Pro shares some features with the Chief Architect products, but is limited in many respects.

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What I meant by remotely is when I am traveling or simply away from my PC I can still continue learning and working on the software.  CA chat said I can install in multiple computers but only allowed to use one computer at a time.  I thought of Mac (for a laptop) just to see if it will be any better compared to PC or Windows based computer.

 

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I use a Mac specifically because I like the way it seamlessly integrates all my devices through iCloud, not because it's better than a PC. 

I work in the office on an IMac and all my plan files are saved to my iCloud folder. 

When I go see a client, I grab my MacBook and don't even have to think twice, I know that when I get to my client's place the file I was working on is right there on my laptop. When I get back to the office and open my Imac the changes I made while at the client's are right there as well. 

I have a late 2011 IMac and a 2013 MacBook and never experience any sort of lag or crashing. 

16g of ram in both and only 512 megs of video ram. Not exactly a screaming beast but it doesn't have to be spec'd to the gills as in the PC world. 

However, this lack of muscle power also means that if I want to Raytrace an image that requires 100 passes I'm definitely at a disadvantage as the system wil take eons to raytrace compared to some of the beasts guys on this forum have. 

My raytraces are usually only 10 pass and take about 1 minute to produce. 

It's good enough to give my clients a good perspective on their home to be. 

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I bought my first computer (Commodore) in 1978

 

one rule to go by is to consider what software you want to run

then buy the computer that runs that software

 

also consider that Apple has about 25% of the market

so I stay with PC's because it is mainstream

 

do you really want to learn two OS's :(

 

pick one or the other - but to be working on A then switch to B

and go back and forth :(

 

Lew

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14 minutes ago, lbuttery said:

I bought my first computer (Commodore) in 1978

 

one rule to go by is to consider what software you want to run

then buy the computer that runs that software

 

also consider that Apple has about 25% of the market

so I stay with PC's because it is mainstream

 

do you really want to learn two OS's :(

 

pick one or the other - but to be working on A then switch to B

and go back and forth :(

 

Lew

 

 

That was the way it was 20 years ago. I have a mac,  no issues wishing I had a PC.  Both work well,  but to say the Mac is not worthy because it isn't a PC is just wrong

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2 hours ago, lbuttery said:

also consider that Apple has about 25% of the market

 

For U.S. desktop systems, Apple has only about 20% market share. Worldwide, only 11.7%. http://gs.statcounter.com/os-market-share/desktop/worldwide

I like Macs, but mainstream it ain't. However, if you're using other Apple products like an iPad, maybe a Mac makes more sense. 

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Warren:

 

just curious as I don't use the "cloud" for much - I do have Carbonite

 

isn't there "cloud" services available for PC's also ???

 

is there something special about the "Icloud" ???

 

I have a friend who is very happy with all her Apple devices and "Icloud"

but I haven't really bothered to understand what it all does for her

 

Surprisingly, since I started in 1978 I have never used an Apple device

never put my hands on one to even try it

 

I stayed with Commodore until they went bankrupt in 1994 and been PC ever since

I was using PC's at work and didn't want the confusion of using two platforms

 

since I have retired in 2012 I have stayed with the familiar PC

still on Win7 as I don't like Win10 - I have had a Surface PRO for a year but rarely touch it

I had planned to get it on with it while I was snowbirding in my cabin but keep putting it off

 

maybe someday I will investigate the Apple world of things ....

 

Lew

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You don't need carbonite if you understand how to use iCloud. 

I guess a Dropbox solution for PC would be equivalent. 

You have everything always up to date and backed up across all your devices. 

I also back up a mirror of my computers on an external hard drive as well - extra level of security. However assuming you purchase all of your software legitimately then this is also not necessary if you properly use iCloud/Dropbox. 

 

It's easy to understand. iCloud/Dropbox is simply another local drive on your hard disk but with the added fucntionaliy of also mirroring an identical copy of itself on severs at Aplle/Dropbox, i.e. "in the cloud".

When you save a document to your iCloud folder on your hard drive, changes are updated to the cloud whenever your computer is idle. 

It all happens as you work and behind the scenes so you never have to worry about it. Work on one computer, pick up and continue on another. 

Send a customer a PDF of his plans and you instantly have that PDF on your iPhone or iPad as well, for when he calls you with a question at 10pm while your at a babptism....

 

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PC's can be just as connected as MAC's these days and I just prefer the value and customization that PC's offer. I am also OS agnostic, just get me to my software so I can get my work done, either through Apple's OS or Windows OS, I don't care, but like I said I prefer PC's flexibility.

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Here is my take on Apple vs. PC...

 

Apple products are notably integrated and stable.  You don't have to do much of anything to link your Apple Watch, your iPhone, your iPad, and your Mac and the chances you'll ever get any major bugs, get hacked, or have your system crash seem to be notably lower than they are with a PC.  On the flipside of the same token and for the same exact reasons, Apple products can be far less customizable (both physically and OS-wise, have less options when in comes to available software and hardware, are less up-gradable, and are more difficult to work on yourself.  In order to gain stability and a very seamless and consistent experience across all products, Apple seems to have chosen a much more rigid, streamlined, and proprietary approach and if you don't mind the aforementioned limitations, I think Apple products are awesome.

 

PC's on the other hand can be configured and modified in almost any way you can dream up.  The possibilities are basically endless with regard to hardware and software, and you can work on them yourself pretty easily.  Again, on the flipside of that same that same coin though, not all those hardware and software combinations work well together, you are more likely to have crashes and experience OS bugs, and due to the more "open" approach...are more likely to get viruses and such.  You can't always link up different products or across different platforms very well either. 

 

For me personally I don't mind the limitations when it comes to my smart phone and so iPhone's are all we ever buy.  They are highly stable, notoriously secure, and they communicate extremely well with each other.  On the other hand, I'm not so okay with the limitations when it comes to my desktop and so for me...it's PC all the way. 

 

 

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if you're "new" to CA.

 

just whatever computer you have. if you have Mac...use it, if you have PC, use that.

CA will work for both PC, and Mac.

 

no point in burning couple $K on a computer when you're just starting up.

 

 

 

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You don't need carbonite if you understand how to use iCloud. 

 

Michael:

 

I suspect not - as I have 30,000+ files - almost 400 GB - for my history research

as Perry stated Carbonite seems to be the way to go for massive backups

 

Lew

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1 hour ago, lbuttery said:

You don't need carbonite if you understand how to use iCloud. 

 

Michael:

 

I suspect not - as I have 30,000+ files - almost 400 GB - for my history research

as Perry stated Carbonite seems to be the way to go for massive backups

 

Lew

I agree for massive backups, such as yourselves and possibly the Smithonian, Carbonite and the like are necessary, but it doesn't give you the kind of seemlwss portability of a cloud service like Dropbox or ICloud. 

Using both would be ideal. Each has its strength. 

 

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seemlwss portability of a cloud service like Dropbox or ICloud

 

Michael:

 

I agree, I currently don't use Dropbox as I am retired from Chief

and no need for my historical research at this time

 

if I did it would only be for the primary projects I was working on at that time

 

I have everything on a shirt pocket USB hard drive

so I can take it anywhere I go

 

Lew

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For back up I use Carbonite with my PC laptop and desktop. I also use Dropbox, ICloud and other free storage services mainly for the transferring and sharing of files with clients. I never actively use any adjunct services for "actively working on" .plan files as Chief is not properly programmed to work on remote files (you are better off only working on active files directly from your hard drive). Nothing but trouble ensues when some of my clients and students have tried to work active files from ICloud, dropbox and other such services. If you or others get different results I am happy for you, I know from others experiences that trying to do so is merely a source of unnecessary trouble and loss.

 

DJP

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Not necessarily a MAC versus PC issue but I use both DropBox and Carbonite and curious as to why anyone would use just one solution. Carbonite is like $50 a year for unlimited backup and even though DropBox is supposed to have file recovery I don't trust it to be honest.

 

I have only used Carbonite 2 times in many years, to recover 2 files that were hopelessly trashed and unrecoverable in Chief. Recovering those files saved me many many hours of work and I swear by Carbonite for that reason alone. I have 858 GB backed up right now and it is such cheap insurance that really works for me and after recovering those 2 files I wouldn't be without it.

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