davidinvest

How Do I Acheive This?

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Basically you, in an elevation camera, using a closed poly-line shape it to your needs and then use the "Convert poly-line" tool (Edit Tool bar when the closed poly-line is selected) choosing Convert to poly-line solid. It is basically a custom slab, created in an elevation camera.

 

DJP

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davidinvest,

 

In your previous post I outlined how to create a Material Region. You can follow the same steps, but instead of converting the closed polyline to a Material Region, convert it to a Polyline Solid. Then switch to plan view to  position the solid in the x-y axis.

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From the elevation the curved shape appears to be a porch of sorts. If that is the case and there is depth to the space beyond those colums I would probably make that curve with a doorway and then shape the ceiling or use a fake ceiling out of a molding or polyline solid shape. The columns would obscure the door casing on the sides. There would be some cad work to get the plan view to appear correctly but that would be the case anyways since those columns are actually pilasters (probably).

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I am not sure if anyone else does this....but I thought of it a few weeks ago and wondered why I never did it before.

Basically a pony wall with no wall on bottom.  Makes a nice tool for setting porches and getting siding right.   I used to use invisible walls or railings and then detail with soffits...etc.  This works much better and plays nicer with other 3d elements.  (dont have to mess with as much stuff to get to show right in 3d.

 

 

I use it not only for arched porches, but any porch really.

porch with pony reverse.plan

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That's a great idea! I usually use polyline solids. I might give this a try.

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I am not sure if anyone else does this....but I thought of it a few weeks ago and wondered why I never did it before.

Basically a pony wall with no wall on bottom.  Makes a nice tool for setting porches and getting siding right.   I used to use invisible walls or railings and then detail with soffits...etc.  This works much better and plays nicer with other 3d elements.  (dont have to mess with as much stuff to get to show right in 3d.

 

 

I use it not only for arched porches, but any porch really.

 

Very creative idea!

 

For what its worth, you can do the same thing by just dragging the wall up in elevation too.

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Very creative idea!

 

For what its worth, you can do the same thing by just dragging the wall up in elevation too.

I like to do most of my work in 2d but you are right.

 

One thing that I need to change is the line properties of the lower layer called "no wall" so it only has a single line at the outer perimeter.   That way it will display better on floor plans.

 

I am thinking this ponywall method is an advantage in that way as well. (being able to have floor plans show porches defined by walls more accurately).

 

I then generally go in an manually draw CAD for any beams required on a layer I create for that purpose.   Depending upon the engineer I am working with, sometimes we only do "A's" and everything in on floor plans.   Others like separate "S" pages.   I have layer sets defined for either purpose. 

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I am not sure if anyone else does this....but I thought of it a few weeks ago and wondered why I never did it before.

Basically a pony wall with no wall on bottom.  Makes a nice tool for setting porches and getting siding right.   I used to use invisible walls or railings and then detail with soffits...etc.  This works much better and plays nicer with other 3d elements.  (dont have to mess with as much stuff to get to show right in 3d.

 

 

I use it not only for arched porches, but any porch really.

 

Clever approach,  but is it Important whether the studs show?

post-50-0-66536800-1454682532_thumb.png

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Your method is on the left,  my method on the right,  I have fewer problems with the framing showing through and I have ben able to vary the opening sizes.  Not trying to be a jerk,  but trying to work with anybody to figure out best method to achieve the goal.

 

I do have problems with the finish wrapping around opening if the window goes all the way to the porch floor,  I have to hold it off floor by about 1"

 

 

post-50-0-58470800-1454683276_thumb.png

d d porch with pony reverse and arches dsh 1.plan

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Your method is on the left,  my method on the right,  I have fewer problems with the framing showing through and I have ben able to vary the opening sizes.  Not trying to be a jerk,  but trying to work with anybody to figure out best method to achieve the goal.

 

I do have problems with the finish wrapping around opening if the window goes all the way to the porch floor,  I have to hold it off floor by about 1"

No egos at all!   I appreciate it.   I too want to do things the easiest way.

Been a while since I messed with this, so I am glad it came up.

 

I like your idea from a 3d point of view, but it does not look how I want it on floor plans.   Here is what I did, a little better explained this time.

 

I fixed the wall line definition so it displays the porch perimeter properly in plan view.  I fixed the siding issue (on right side for illustrative purposes) using the wall break tool and then used the edit intersection tool to make sure the siding went through as I wanted it.  (You break it at the "T" intersection)

post-3615-0-24789100-1454685193_thumb.png

d d porch with pony reverse and arches ver2.plan

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No egos at all!   I appreciate it.   I too want to do things the easiest way.

Been a while since I messed with this, so I am glad it came up.

 

THIS TOPIC CAME UP A WEEK OR SO AGO,  I GOT NO SUPPORT,  I WAS ASKING FOR CORNER DOORWAYS  (SIMILAR TO THE CORNER WINDOWS WE RECENTLY RECEIVED),  NO SUPPORT AT ALL,  I DID NOT EVEN GET A "GOOD IDEA" FROM THE POWERS TO BE

 

I like your idea from a 3d point of view, but it does not look how I want it on floor plans.  

 

UNDERSTAND,  I THINK THIS CAN BE HANDLED IF WE HAD "CORNER DOORWAYS"  BUT AS STATED ABOVE,  NOBODY UNDERSTOOD THE VALUE SO NO SUPPORT FROM THE USERS

 

Here is what I did, a little better explained this time.

 

I fixed the wall line definition so it displays the porch perimeter properly in plan view.  I fixed the siding issue (on right side for illustrative purposes) using the wall break tool and then used the edit intersection tool to make sure the siding went through as I wanted it.  (You break it at the "T" intersection)

 

I UNDERSTAND,  GOOD SOLUTION,  BUT A LOT OF WORK.....  AND WHEN I SAY A LOT OF WORK....  I AM THINKING OF DOWN THE ROAD WHEN THE CLIENT CHANGES THE SIZE OF THE PORCH AND YOU MAY HAVE TO REWORK WHAT YOU DID

 

I appreciate you bringing it up,  again I think my method has more advantages than yours,  but neither is perfect,  I wish CA would look into this and see how they would solve this issue.

 

This does not come up often,  but when it does,  it would be swell if we had an idiot proof method of accomplishing what you and I are talking about.

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I appreciate you bringing it up,  again I think my method has more advantages than yours,  but neither is perfect,  I wish CA would look into this and see how they would solve this issue.

 

This does not come up often,  but when it does,  it would be swell if we had an idiot proof method of accomplishing what you and I are talking about.

Do you turn off those walls (over the porch) in floor plan view and manually draw in CAD?.

 

My method is based on getting the working drawings as the most important.   The 3d is less important to me.   I do a lot of 3d in the drawing process but am not willing to compromise my working drawings to get a better look 3d.  (boy...you should see what I have to go through modeling custom ceilings ;) )

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Do you turn off those walls (over the porch) in floor plan view and manually draw in CAD?.

 

My method is based on getting the working drawings as the most important.   The 3d is less important to me.   I do a lot of 3d in the drawing process but am not willing to compromise my working drawings to get a better look 3d.  (boy...you should see what I have to go through modeling custom ceilings ;) )

 

I have not figured out if I should turn off walls.  If the DOORWAYS were usable,  I would not need to turn off.....  my goal is always to minimize minimize minimize the cad work.  I am always thinking about revisions because they always come up.  I should be able to build a model and for it to look correct in plan view WITHOUT CAD.

 

I know,  I was not clear answering your question because I do not have a good answer yet.

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I have not figured out if I should turn off walls.  If the DOORWAYS were usable,  I would not need to turn off.....  my goal is always to minimize minimize minimize the cad work.  I am always thinking about revisions because they always come up.  I should be able to build a model and for it to look correct in plan view WITHOUT CAD.

 

I know,  I was not clear answering your question because I do not have a good answer yet.

Gotcha!

 

I know the feeling.   Been messing with this stuff since V6 (not x6).   Funny I still see new ways to get things done!

 

I like using selective CAD layers as it gives me some flexibility.   Sometimes I just know a "beam" needs to go certain places, and a 2D representation is all I need.   While I do go into 3D for structure at times (to make sure of beam, rafter, joist clearance), I dont fully detail plans in 3d.   I just use it as a tool to make sure all the elevation info, wall plate info..etc will work out in the field if executed right.

 

I use 3d to communicate with clients but dont translate any of it into working drawings.  (except for the pretty picture on cover page ;) )

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I like to do most of my work in 2d but you are right.

 

One thing that I need to change is the line properties of the lower layer called "no wall" so it only has a single line at the outer perimeter.   That way it will display better on floor plans.

 

I am thinking this ponywall method is an advantage in that way as well. (being able to have floor plans show porches defined by walls more accurately).

 

I then generally go in an manually draw CAD for any beams required on a layer I create for that purpose.   Depending upon the engineer I am working with, sometimes we only do "A's" and everything in on floor plans.   Others like separate "S" pages.   I have layer sets defined for either purpose.

But what about the framing with headers, posts?

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Not sure what you mean? Are you speaking of 3d framing?

Obviously I did not put cols in there as it had nothing to do with the question of the op.

As for header.....also not sure what you mean. Would it not be flush in said condition? You can use moulding poly line if you want to wrap with trim or a soffit and adjust poNY wall ht.

Not sure if that is what you are asking?

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To the original poster here is a You Tube Video I made for you explaining poly-line solids and 3D modlings:



DJP

PS: I did search the Chief Architect Inc Training Videos first and found nothing useful there

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I'm talking about real framing as it would really be in the field, and show in sections as it should. Using a p-solid of course doesn't have any framing so when you cut a section thru one- no framing. On something like that I would use a railing wall (post to beam) for the lower portion and roof plane and curved ceiling plane for the arch. That way you get all the framing. If you just need it to look good then your way is good until you need details.

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