popetorak

Why is it so impossible to put in topo maps

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The links don't work, data doesn't work 

 

Anybody got a REAL tutorial to use?

 

Don't know why its so hard to do  a simple thing

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First of all, your post makes no sense to me?  What links don't work, data doesn't work?  A real tutorial?   To do what? Input topo maps? Why is it so hard to do a simple thing, now you're talking?   But of course I'm not sure what simple things you are referring too? Sorry, not being sarcastic, just sharing what I'm sure the others on the forum are asking them selves. Also, It would help if you would use the link below and follow the instructions to update your signature to include the Soft Ware Version you're using, and some computer info as this often helps the others (smarter and more proficient than I) to help you.

Otherwise, welcome to the forum!

 

https://chieftalk.chiefarchitect.com/topic/18908-signature-here-at-chief-talk

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Quote

If you are referring to terrain features it is a somewhat complex area for even seasoned veterans because the terrain program is an integrated separate program from what I'm told.  Try YouTube for aftermarket videos, some of them are excellent.

 

 

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1 hour ago, Evolution said:

data doesn't work

I think he is referencing CSV import terrain tools under File/Import/Import Terrain Data/

Personally I think CA does a great job of interpolating by using a minimum number of datums to complete the terrain model.

I would NOT use chief for Cut/Fill calcs, and otherwise how accurate do you need the terrain model to be? It can be 100% accurate but at an exorbitant cost with little benefit to the designer or client. 

The ultimate question is, what do you need to represent with your terrain? Then we can craft a viable response. I'm happy to do terrain models for clients as a contractor, please contact me if needed. I'm also happy to gift my time on these forums pointing people toward resources or creating instructional videos.

To the OP. Please post all relevant files so we can take a look.

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1 hour ago, popetorak said:

Anybody got a REAL tutorial to use?

 

Not really since you gave us No Clue as to what you are trying to do......Import Topo Data? .... nor provided any of the Files you are Importing....

 

 

let me Guess...........

 

Import a DWG ?

https://www.chiefarchitect.com/support/article/KB-00719/importing-terrain-elevation-data-from-a-dxf-or-dwg-file.html

https://www.chiefarchitect.com/support/article/KB-01078/using-real-world-elevation-data-to-create-a-terrain.html

 

Import GPS Data ?

 

Some Chief Terrain Videos

https://www.chiefarchitect.com/videos/playlists/101/terrain-and-site-plans.html

 

Feel free to elaborate after you calm down :P:)

 

M.

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7 hours ago, Renerabbitt said:

I would NOT use chief for Cut/Fill calcs

 

I would...and have.  There are a couple pretty great (albeit rather complex and advanced) methods I've developed and utilized.  There are different variations of each and they can be further automated using some more complex steps, Ruby, text macros, and/or macros in Excel, but here are the 2 basic methods in their simplest forms and in a grossly understated nutshell...

 

Method #1 (using solids): 

  • Draw an existing terrain
  • Draw a proposed terrain
  • Use Multiple Copied Polyline Solids that reference terrain at top (these should represent your desired sample size and shouldn't be more than you really need), convert to Solids, combine using Solid Union, and chop the bottom off at a specific height using another Solid.  This will result in a solid version of your terrain from which you can get a Volume using Ruby.  Do this for both terrain versions.
  • Use those 2 terrains to get your starting volumes of each terrain.
  • Use Solid Intersection to find undisturbed volume of those 2 combined terrains.
  • Take Cut and Fill volumes from that.

 

Method #2 (using an object and schedule to automate the old-school grid method):

  • Draw an existing terrain
  • Draw a proposed terrain
  • Use a multiple copied object that has a schedule to distribute your "grid" reference heights.  This multiple copied object should reference the terrain at bottom (0") and should have a usable "bottom" in its schedule.  Once distributed, change the reference to absolute (but DO NOT change the height).  Drop a schedule with a "bottom" column into the plan.  This should give you a list of your sample heights that you can simply copy/paste into a spreadsheet for your existing terrain.  Copy paste your distributed objects and schedule to your proposed plan, and repeat the appropriate parts of the process to get numbers for your proposed terrain.
  • Use Excel or other spreadsheet to carry out desire calcs.

 

Quick Note:  The required boolean operations for Method #1 can take a long time for Chief to carry out so don't overdo the sample quantity, and the schedule for Method #2 will be very slow to work with since it will inevitably be quite large...especially if you use any macros to further automate the thing, so again...don't overdo the sample quantity.  

 

...and that's about all I have the time or inclination to spell out on that right now.  Totally doable though and the results can be about as accurate as you can get anywhere else.  As accurate as you want to get really.

 

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OP wins record for fastest-after-join to reach -2 rep with fewest posts. :o

 

1 hour ago, Alaskan_Son said:

I would...and have.  

 

Wow very impressive.

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16 hours ago, Alaskan_Son said:

Use Multiple Copied Polyline Solids that reference terrain at top (these should represent your desired sample size and shouldn't be more than you really need), convert to Solids, combine using Solid Union, and chop the bottom off at a specific height using another Solid.  This will result in a solid version of your terrain...

 

This is something that I've requested before and would love to be able to accomplish with Chief. I've done this before using sketchup with exported chief terrain models which actually worked out really well but never had any luck actually get a Chief terrain shape into a solid like you describe here. Would you mind making a little video of how you did the above step in method #1 but I also understand if you're to busy for that so no worries if not. I'll continue to tinker around and see if I can get it also. I appreciate all you contribute to these forums Micheal.

 

Here is the post I made a long while make about this. I do wonder if this process has been made easier with X12 since they changed how poly-line solid and solids seem to work.

 

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20 hours ago, popetorak said:

he links don't work, data doesn't work 

 

What, exactly are you speaking of in detail please?

20 hours ago, popetorak said:

Anybody got a REAL tutorial to use? 

 

To do what, exactly?

 

20 hours ago, popetorak said:

Don't know why its so hard to do  a simple thing

 

Terrain in terms of importation, is kinda simple but very exacting and the results for complex terrain can even overwhelm the average PC or Mac with beau coup 3D faces making the results unusable in practical terms (Topography software does not use "3D Faves" for topo maps, chief does.

 

If whatever you are asking about is so simple, why can't you please simply but in detail, state your problem with some exactitude please?

 

DJP

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17 hours ago, Alaskan_Son said:
 
 
 
 Alaskan_Son said:

 

I would...and have.  There are a couple pretty great (albeit rather complex and advanced) methods I've developed and utilized. 

 

 

 

Man the second one is brilliant! 

 

 I used chief for cut/bal calcs on my own house. Albeit not as elegantly as you!

 

I made my terrain model and the in 3d set the material of the terrain to be transparent.  Then using a series of polyline solids (color coded red and blue), I sized my "cut" areas, and my "fill" areas, and then using the DBX I got volume of my solids.   Then it was a simple table.

 

 

Your second option just shows how many cool and interesting ways there are to get things done.  LOVE IT!

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To answer the OP, I do topo all the time.   Easiest is to get the surveyor to give me a DWG.

 

I import w/ ft as scale.  Select convert to polylines where possible (I think that is what it says).

 

I then clean up crap I dont need, by deleting or moving to an alt layer set.  Rotate as desired.  Then I check each topo line by selecting it.  If they are broken my test or labels, you have to connect them.   I move them all to a layerset I have named for my topo info

 

Then I create terrain perimeter and snap the corners to the survey (or run bigger if wanted)

 

I convert my polylines to elevation data and start entering the data.  Most of the time I reduce it to simple feet by dropping the 100's number.    Sometimes I take my lowest point and call that "0", and then just go up by incriments of 2.   Whatever strikes me as the easiest.  ( I can always reference a benchmark later)

 

For 3d views, I use sidewalks for prop lines and set back.  I "paint" them red and or yellow as desired.   Pretty simple.  Here is a pretty nasty lake lot I modeled as an example.

 

 

 

 

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