Diamond-built

Business Card Question

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Hello Everyone, 

I've been doing house plans for one contractor now and I'm looking to get my name out their to get more clients. i am a licences contractor but I am not a licences architect. Is their anyone else running a business making house drawings that's not a architect either?  If so what do you say on your business cards and also your website?

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I've done it for over 40+ years now. I also use a licensed structural Engineer on every project.

No website, never needed one. Cards just say Building Designer / drafting. Contracts also say I am not a licensed Architect

as so classified by the state of California

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What does your local and state codes require, in my area I can do residential and townhouses without a license, also work with a Structural Engineer/Architect for any question or commercial work

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Same here.  That is all I do.  I know a good amount of it from just experience, but I need to get my engineer to review what I have done and stamp it.

 

Just like Perry, I put building designer / drafter and making it clear contractually that you are not an engineer or architect.   I have a website that I am working on that should be launched in a couple weeks and it will have similar verbiage on it.

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California follows the business and profession code so any homeowner can do their own plans for residential. 3 stories is ok, but around here you couldn't get permit without a structural engineers stamp.

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I know that when I have drawn my own set of house plans to build a house my local lumber supplier would stamp the drawings for me. How much does your  licensed structural Engineer charge for each project?

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Has anyone got certified through AIBD http://www.aibd.org? From what I can see is gives you a stamp to put on each drawing that would pass for permits. What does anyone know about this and what are your thoughts?

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I doubt AIBD gives you a stamp that allows you to submit permits ?

 

It may be a stamp that has your AIBD membership info/logo ???

 

 

it varies from state to state but only a homeowner or a licensed builder or architect or engineer

can stamp/sign permits

 

Lew

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yes, it is best to have a contract with your client

whether that client is a homeowner or a builder or  ???

 

 

Lew

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I know her in WA, I could do prescriptive when I don't need a stamp, but other than that, I have my engineer do that.  The price for engineering widely varies from location to location.  Also, I believe AIBD certification is just that you took their course and meet their levels of proficiency.  Like Lew, I highly doubt they are a cert you can go with to "stamp" plans.

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I would put questions to yourself before the business card.

1. What is your goal?

2. Who are you? Are you a designer? A drafter?

3. Who are your potential clients? Builders? Homeowners?

4. Do you have design training (or ability)?

5. Do you have an attorney for your business? (This is the only person who should write a contract. You need a contract.)

6. Do you have a web presence? You don't have to have your own website these days. You could set up a HOUZZ  or Facebook page to showcase your work.

7. Do you have the time to take on new clients or are you busy building (general contractor)?

more...

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Has anyone got certified through AIBD http://www.aibd.org? From what I can see is gives you a stamp to put on each drawing that would pass for permits. What does anyone know about this and what are your thoughts?

Not around here, its usless

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You guys also have your client sign a contract that you have written up?

yes

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I know that when I have drawn my own set of house plans to build a house my local lumber supplier would stamp the drawings for me. How much does your  licensed structural Engineer charge for each project?

My guys charge from $1500 to $5000 (Markup plans only, no drafting), depending on the project. I also have  a guy that does all his own drafting for more money. Don't use him that much b/c I can do all the drafting.

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yes, it is best to have a contract with your client

whether that client is a homeowner or a builder or  ???

 

 

Lew

 

That's not an option if you are serious about doing business

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yes, it is best to have a contract with your client

whether that client is a homeowner or a builder or  ???

 

 

Lew

Lew, your disclaimer should also be in your contract and the plans, you will have a better chance of it working.

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That's not an option if you are serious about doing business

 

40 years and never had a contract,  knock on wood.

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Perry:

 

I agree and did have the disclaimer in the contract

but also had a reminder on the plans

 

Lew

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Scott

I have a standing contract with Contractors ,some 35 years, just in case. Maybe I should update them .

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40 years and never had a contract,  knock on wood.

In today's law suit happy world, that is quite a statement.

 

In my 29 years of the construction business (first 14 mostly as a framing subcontractor/remodeling, last 15 in design/build), it doesn't matter how good of a product/service you provide, there WILL come a time where you'll thank God you have a contract in place!  I've also been very lucky and never had a project that went to litigation/court, but we all know there is that 5% of customers (some that even come through referrals), that define why we need contracts.

 

I couldn't imagine  doing business without a contract.  Although I would gladly do without the additional paperwork!

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Please correct me if I am wrong.  As I understand it here in Michigan, plans for low-rise residential structures (one and two-family dwellings and maybe townhouses) with not more than 3500 square feet of calculated floor area do not need to be sealed by a licensed engineer or licensed architect.  Any plans for low-rise residential structures over 3500 square feet of calculated floor area plus any and all commercial projects require engineer or architect seals.  The company I work for has a couple structural engineers that they work with.  That is if anything needs to be engineered or if plans need to be sealed.  I believe low-rise residential, as it relates to code, are residential structures not more than three stories above grade plane.

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probably depends on your plans

 

I built an addition for my house and drew the plans

 

yet because of the spans and a few other details I had to have an architect review and stamps the plans

 

then as homeowner I could submit them

 

whenever starting a project it is best to have a chat with the permit office

to see what they will require

 

Lew

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