tricky molding intersection


Lighthouse
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This is an invitation to CA power users to see my posting under services needed.  I have a tricky question and I don't feel right asking someone to answer for free, so I posted it there (but I don't know if anyone really checks that, so I posted here also :-))

rake.JPG

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Not fun,  3d moldings are useless.....  for me....  frieze boards are hit and miss for even the easy ones.......  you situation will take tine.........  I have a feeling somebody is going to prove me wrong.

 

My latest attempt at using the frieze method is attached.....

 

92.thumb.jpg.41100ce85bcce489bd082464014e7f89.jpg93.thumb.jpg.e5eddc34dc593f818a3c92439959fde1.jpg91.thumb.jpg.8309335352d75755dfeb0a3a8271089b.jpg

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23 hours ago, Lighthouse said:

so I posted here also

 

4 hours ago, kMoquin said:

them to miter cleanly

 

22 hours ago, dshall said:

somebody is going to prove me wrong.

Proof of concept(not perfect, i'll leave that to you David) and it can be very quick to achieve with a little fudging here and there:

hornstein.thumb.png.63d2bcb73d35265780b7274cba02e611.png

make your molding, set your roof eaves to square cut (plumb requires multiple moldings and more work as mentioned by kMo)

set your molding upper portion to the shadow boards in the roof dbx.

set molding lower to frieze on gable only

add a molding polyline for the intersecting band

fudge your molding numbers as needed to have the band cover the bottom of the frieze on the gable end

hornstein.plan

notice we don't have a clean 45 all the way through the banding, it jogs..to make it perfect requires two upper moldings, one for the gable and one for the eave on a plumb cut eave( you can fudge this by making offset roof overhangs)

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This is a variation on Bill's which uses the same method I posted earlier in the services section. The problem with the wood photo and Bills method arises when you connect the run of gutter on the long horizontal which neither shows.

image.thumb.png.605e30c2c3a88c0a897e9e837b37ce47.png

So instead of making the eave assembly with the gutter profile as is I tilted it by the pitch. Then after converting to a symbol the entire symbol is tilted to the pitch.

image.thumb.png.78078fd45ee31859d105dcaaaf1facd9.png

This will connect to any horizontal gutters correctly with the only modification to the molding taking place at the eave. It's still a bit of a bear to do in the field to determine your saw setting though. This is one reason that any detail you dig up on these will have extra flat molding sections to ensure it is sealed off properly.

image.thumb.png.0d9b895cab866b40d6b247915621eec0.png

As I noted yesterday I'd favor doing as the photo of the actual on a house above which has no gutter on the face of the eave where the slope would be silly deep for water anyway.

The only other alternative is with a short flat as Glenn and I think someone else posted yesterday, at least if you are looking for something that can actually be done IRL.

 

molding for cornice tilted.plan

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35 minutes ago, johnny said:

I think its areas like this Chief could seriously improve modeling tools

While I agree there are places that the modeling tools could use improvement I don't think that is the problem with this instance. It's a question of what can be done in reality. Chief will not miter this with a 3D modling line when coming in at an angle because it can't be done IRL.

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To make this cut perfect you have to do it the same way as you would do crown molding and like Mike said you have to use solids and the piece that will make the cut must be at the right angle as you would set the miter saw to make the cut, which will be the solid piece instead of the miter blade to make a subtraction. You would need to know the spring angle of the crown, roof slope angle,etc 

It's much easier and faster to do this in SketchUp and you have to place the molding flat with top edge molding as it would lay on the saw against the fence and you have to set the miter angle and saw blade bevel angle that would be one cut and you use the same angles to cut the other piece and join them together and bring them into a the CA and you can use stretch plains to put them together.

 

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On 7/30/2019 at 1:41 PM, MarkMc said:

While I agree there are places that the modeling tools could use improvement I don't think that is the problem with this instance. It's a question of what can be done in reality. Chief will not miter this with a 3D modling line when coming in at an angle because it can't be done IRL.

Yep, you are correct - I guess what I meant was to model this correct its a PITA in Chief trying to make either molding lines or solids work compared to most modern BIM apps that have straightforward modeling action to produce a predictable result.

 

I feel the folks at Chief are a bit too comfortable with the idea of work-arounds being considered "best practices".

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17 hours ago, Ridge_Runner said:

Kevin, is this an "old school" detail you came up with somewhere or one you created? It certainly brought back some old memories from drafting classes.:)

Mike, I grabbed the image online.

It is really well described in the book "Get Your House Right"

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