mslewis620

Advice on how to show different PH's

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Trying to accurately show elevations for addition/remodel. Existing PH is 8'2". 

 

Adding porch across back of family room to cut some of the western sun but not ruin the view of backyard. Because the roof extends over the porch the rear wall of family room can accommodate 8' doors with 9' PH. 

 

In the kitchen to the left of family client wants a 9' flat ceiling but hip was in the way so truss engineer is using 9' PH at common wall only- the boxed eave for the existing structure on the right will be an undershot at small porch. 

 

Never had to do this so looking for advice on easiest way to tackle this. I've tried a few things but nothing is quite right. 

 

Attached truss layout.

B16-024_Layout_03-11-16.pdf

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So far I have not found a definition for "PH" that applies to Architecture or Construction, if one exists, I need to know what you mean using it as you have please in order to proffer help.

 

DJP

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The only thing I can think of he means  "proposed height" but I looked up historical abbreviations which are listed from Architectural Graphic Standards, 1912, 1951, and 1956,  PH would mean:  Phase, Preheat, Phone which don't go with anything he posted. 

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David:

 

I think PH is porch height but, I could be wrong.  I think the OP needs to attach the plan rather than a PDF of the roof (truss) plan.  Perhaps a little more information would be helpful as well.

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Plate Height - common term in California - what framers & truss designers use here when referring to wall height. I'm a GC so I sometimes use terminology that we use the in the field. The truss designer and I have been referring to it as plate height while working out the roof layout. 

 

Not sure posting a plan would help as I can't show the condition correctly. The truss plan accurately reflects the roof and trying to show it in elevation view. I could do it manually but sometimes that creates unexpected consequences. 

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I think he is talking plate height or the PH value

 

or

 

pH is a measure of how acidic/basic water is. The range goes from 0 - 14, with 7 being neutral. pHs of less than 7 indicate acidity, whereas a pH of greater than 7 indicates a base. pH is really a measure of the relative amount of free hydrogen and hydroxyl ions in the water.

 

I think he is talking plate height.

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Remember that Chief operates on the premise that ROOMS take precedent over WALLS. Set the PH of the rooms to the desired height.

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Joey that's what I've been doing but I need to change just one wall and that's where problems start to occur. I think I'm going to leave it alone on the elevation and show it correctly on the roof plan.  In the field it will get built correctly as I am building the house and know the plans intimately. Thanks for the advice. 

 

I'm surprised no one knows PH is plate height. The truss engineer agreed but different parts of the country use different terms.
 

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I don't think there's any way you're going to get an accurate answer without a plan.  If we could tell what you were talking about from your original post and the truss plans there would be no reason for you to draw plan in the first place. 

 

I always find it somewhat interesting when people here say that the plan isn't necessary when we pay thousands of dollars for software and people pay us thousands of dollars to draw plans...And why do we draw plans?  For the sole purpose of communicating information.  Seems like if anyone would understand the importance of seeing the whole picture it would be the designers and builders on this forum.

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..........And why do we draw plans?  ......

 

 

To communicate......  as Alan L.  says,  " A picture is worth a thousand words".  

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Perhaps an energy heel(ed) truss. Raise the height of the truss off the plate, and leave the PH as is. See if that gives you the desired result.

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To show your plate heights on your roof framing plan, I think I would try to show all the walls under the roof framing, or in the minimum, the walls' main layer.  Then, you can place a point marker on each wall section with text showing the plate height for that section of wall.  I have done it this way on some plans.  Where the plate elevation changes along a wall section, you might consider placing a CAD line across the wall and adding text that describes the line as the location where the plate height changes.  Just make sure you have markers with the correct plate heights on either side of the break line.

 

The primary way to show plate heights is on your elevation views, which can include sections through the interior of your model used to accurately detail any elevation changes in specific locations.  You can obviously add as many sections of your construction plans to demonstrate how it is to be built.

 

post-191-0-99896800-1458078114_thumb.jpg

 

 

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