buildinthevoid

Creating Different Ceiling Heights

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How could I go about changing the ceiling heights of the same room like in the attached picture? There's a second floor above this room. I used the room divider tool, but the whole ceiling still adjusts to the same height.

capture5.jpg

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Did you lower the ceiling height for the room you divided off ?  I think that is all you missed.

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1 hour ago, Chopsaw said:

Did you lower the ceiling height for the room you divided off ?  I think that is all you missed.

I don't think so, I divided the section of the room, then decreased the height for that area but the entire room adjusted to the height I inputted. 

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Please post your plan...or at least an example plan.  Thanks 

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8 hours ago, buildinthevoid said:

There's a second floor above this room.

 

What is the 2nd floor supposed to do? Remain in place, drop down to match the ceiling below?

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7 hours ago, buildinthevoid said:
9 hours ago, Chopsaw said:

Did you lower the ceiling height for the room you divided off ?  I think that is all you missed.

I don't think so, I divided the section of the room, then decreased the height for that area but the entire room adjusted to the height I inputted. 

 

In theory Eric's suggestion is the way to go it seems.  Try to drop the floor level of the room above and delete the room dividers on the level below.

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On 3/22/2020 at 12:42 AM, buildinthevoid said:

I don't think so, I divided the section of the room, then decreased the height for that area but the entire room adjusted to the height I inputted. 

 

If the 2nd floor room remains at the Original Height ???  then add an appropriate depth ( 18"?) AirGap to the Ceiling Finish in the Room you want the lowered Ceiling in.

***  see post further down too....

 

image.thumb.png.3a9ed413dc2b349fb9bdeb81f4328e90.pngimage.thumb.png.e0c303b3f08d411684d287e06efdf657.png

 

 

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If I'm understanding your screenshot and questions correctly, I would typically either use a Polyline Solid or the Soffit tool for the lowered ceiling although there are other ways as well using room definitions or ceiling planes.

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Is the OP still in this or what?  

 

@buildinthevoid - How about attaching a plan so we don't have to keep guessing? 

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On 3/22/2020 at 8:48 AM, Kbird1 said:

 

If the 2nd floor room remains at the Original Height ???  then add an appropriate depth ( 18"?) AirGap to the Ceiling Finish in the Room you want the lowered Ceiling in.

 

image.thumb.png.3a9ed413dc2b349fb9bdeb81f4328e90.pngimage.thumb.png.e0c303b3f08d411684d287e06efdf657.png

 

 

I went about it this way, thanks !

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2 hours ago, buildinthevoid said:

I went about it this way, thanks !

 

That was a quick post on the Weekend and it may not have been clear that you can do the Framing too eg 2x6 ceiling Joists....( or 2x4 whatever .... ) just add a layer of framing so in this case with 2x6 joist ( 5 1/2") make the Air Gap 12 1/2 " not 18".  No Doubt this is a trick I learned here at some point  :) 

 

image.thumb.png.00d83a1911a5e7ee0d3670ad2d8298ed.png

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Something to think about...

 

While there are definitely appropriate scenarios for using the ceiling finish layer to provide a dropped ceiling, I honestly don't think that's typically the best way to handle this particular scenario and it can cause a lot of heartache in the long run.  Using that method requires artificially breaking your room up into multiple rooms using walls.  Those otherwise unnecessary walls and room definitions can start to wreak havoc on cabinets, moldings, wall finishes, floor finishes, room schedules, room names in other schedules, room dimensions, etc. etc.  If the dropped ceiling section doesn't align with a normally defined room area then I believe a soffit, ceiling plane, p-solid, etc. is a much more accurate and suitable method.  Just my 2 cents.

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37 minutes ago, Alaskan_Son said:

Those otherwise unnecessary walls and room definitions can start to wreak havoc

 

I agree , especially if they are room dividers , it may not be the best solution , but for dropping one room's ceiling it works well.

 

M.

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! use ceiling planes for dropped ceilings, I need the framing that can be created in any direction.

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On 3/23/2020 at 7:24 PM, Alaskan_Son said:

While there are definitely appropriate scenarios for using the ceiling finish layer to provide a dropped ceiling, I honestly don't think that's typically the best way to handle this particular scenario and it can cause a lot of heartache in the long run.  Using that method requires artificially breaking your room up into multiple rooms using walls.  Those otherwise unnecessary walls and room definitions can start to wreak havoc on cabinets, moldings, wall finishes, floor finishes, room schedules, room names in other schedules, room dimensions, etc. etc.  If the dropped ceiling section doesn't align with a normally defined room area then I believe a soffit, ceiling plane, p-solid, etc. is a much more accurate and suitable method.  Just my 2 cents.

 

On 3/24/2020 at 8:45 AM, DRAWZILLA said:

! use ceiling planes for dropped ceilings, I need the framing that can be created in any direction.


Question to make sure I'm not missing out on some functionality of ceiling planes;  If you are using them for a dropped ceiling in a part of a room (per OP's pic) then don't you still need to use walls to make the lowered ceiling plane have a vertical finish up to the main ceiling?  Of course soffit can work in many cases too, but then you don't get the framing.

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4 minutes ago, DzinEye said:

 


Question to make sure I'm not missing out on some functionality of ceiling planes;  If you are using them for a dropped ceiling in a part of a room (per OP's pic) then don't you still need to use walls to make the lowered ceiling plane have a vertical finish up to the main ceiling?  Of course soffit can work in many cases too, but then you don't get the framing. 

Ceiling planes work great for walled enclosed rooms but when you have an open side use a room divider wall for that side and in most occasions  that will fill in the dropped area. make sure those room dividers walls are on and not invisible.

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with open different ceiling heights I will just drop the ceiling height in one room and use a room divider wall and it will fill that area in automatically. for walled areas I use a ceiling plane for the drop especially if I need the ceiling joists abv. to continue a the higher level. 2 different methods for 2 different conditions.

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Thank you Perry, good points.
I was mainly curious because Michael suggested the potential problems with using room dividers/hidden walls to create drop ceilings using the ceiling finish layer solution, but it seemed to me that you also need them for ceiling planes... which apparently holds true, so I'm still not sure how the ceiling plane method is better than the method Mick suggested... EXCEPT.. as you pointed out, that with ceiling planes you can control the direction of the framing separately from the ceiling/floor above.

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37 minutes ago, DzinEye said:

Question to make sure I'm not missing out on some functionality of ceiling planes;  If you are using them for a dropped ceiling in a part of a room (per OP's pic) then don't you still need to use walls to make the lowered ceiling plane have a vertical finish up to the main ceiling?

 

No.  You can use any number of things to fill in that area.  In addition to:

  • Walls
  • Walls (No Room Definition)
  • Optionally manually adjusted wall polylines

...you can also use:

  • A second (Copy/Paste Hold Position) ceiling plane that is the full height if the drop and set to be solid drywall in lieu of the framing layer
  • One or more polyline solids
  • One or more molding polylines (along with a 3D molding symbol can even provide unique framing components)
  • A material region (which has some quirks though)
  • An overlayed soffit
  • Etc.
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1 minute ago, Alaskan_Son said:

Walls (No Room Definition)

Ah... this one though... right... it would provide the framing yet not cause problems with dividing up the room.  The others all good suggestions, just that I was thinking only in terms of what would get the framing to show.

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you can also just use an opening (door) with no casing or jamb and stretch it across the opening, which you will need if you have a trey ceiling in one room. one good thing is it will give you a beam.

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