MarkMc

3D molding line with crown on an angle

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Is there a way to make the corners meet when one leg of a 3D molding line is on an angle while the others are horizontal?

Just want to know for the future so I don't waste more time if it come up again.

I eventually resorted to making a symbol from a standard molding line and changing the symbol angle.

post-85-0-66620300-1464886518_thumb.jpg

Pediment.plan

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It won't do it because it can not be done in the real world.  Crown molding has to exist in one plane only.  For instance, it can not be done in a room with vaulted ceilings.

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It won't do it because it can not be done in the real world. Crown molding has to exist in one plane only. For instance, it can not be done in a room with vaulted ceilings.

Not exactly true. It just requires a transition piece.

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I think he is asking about the corners and how to make the crown meet.  A transition piece eliminates the corners coming together (not the same thing).

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I think he is asking about the corners and how to make the crown meet. A transition piece eliminates the corners coming together (not the same thing).

I'm not talking about a plinth block. I'm talking about an additional piece of crown. Kinda like these…post-46-0-12939900-1464888702_thumb.jpegpost-46-0-55163000-1464888720_thumb.jpeg

Mark's example is slightly different because it's an outside corner but the same basic principle applies.

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I guess there's the solution if he is comfortable with that look.

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Here is how it is done IRL. Back legs remain horizontal to the floor but the crown itself is tilted. Only way I could get it to work was making a symbol from a standard molding line and then tilting it.

Was just wondering if there was a way to manipulate the 3D molding line instead.

post-85-0-98756500-1464889010_thumb.png

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That's a nice looking pediment.

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Nice job Mark,  worth a point.

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Thanks guys but can it be done easier?? I think not?

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No, it can't. 

 

Chief has never been able to handle molding transitions like that on 3D Molding Polylines.  I wish it could because it would make custom stair railings much easier to do.

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Hate to keep kicking but........ just another case where not enough tools to do basic 3D things..... much less something more complicated....

post-955-0-49161700-1464898171_thumb.jpg

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After I built it in Chief I asked my assistant, a Solid works and SU guy, how long/hard in SU. He indicated about the same and would use a similar method.

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and next time I know what to do (as does anyone who searches this out)

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It won't do it because it can not be done in the real world.  Crown molding has to exist in one plane only.  For instance, it can not be done in a room with vaulted ceilings.

Well actually it can be done using a 3D molding polyline on a vaulted ceiling. I had to do it years ago to duplicate a bathroom I was doing an existing plan for. Yes, it's kinda difficult to do in Chief, but it can be done on a vaulted ceiling. I believe the only problem is that on one side of the room, you need to use a separate polyline...but doable. I asked my brother (a master at installing molding) about a long time ago about doing this and he said that yes it can be done but you have to cope the corners together. He didn't think it could be done using a compound miter saw but he didn't know for sure because he would only do this by coping it. Like I said, this was done in a house I had to model so I knew it could be done. I did this with one molding 3D molding polyline. I did not fine tune the molding polyline.

 

post-66-0-51466600-1464982086_thumb.jpg

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Now that you mention it-back when I was the shop guy for a builder they would drag me on site to do the weird stuff. Had to run crown around the eaves on a carpenter gothic. There were several head scratching angled sections with angles like this. I'm sure I coped them, always coped molding attached to the building-in or out. I don't remember how I set the cut but SOP was to work out the miter angles before coping, had a java program that worked it out- something like this Rake Crown Calculator -maybe I just fudged it, dunno.

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Mark,

 

I think Chief will building the molding OK - but Chief just can't do the impossible.

You cannot join the molding at the corner with a simple mitre - it is impossible - the 2 moldings will never match up.

BUT, if you tell Chief to build it the same way you would build it in the field, Chief can build it OK.

This is how you would build it in the field and this is how Chief will build it if you correctly tell Chief what to do.

You need to have a small flat section on the ends of the front molding so that you CAN do a simple mitre at the corners.

If you are not happy with the flat sections, then you need to use another technique like tilting the return moldings.

 

Michaels pictures in post #5 demonstrate the same technique - only difference is that they are on internal corners.

post-106-0-52854900-1465009259_thumb.jpg

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