RL-inc

New Computer advice

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I am thinking it is finally time to get a new rig-

I purchased my current system about 7 years ago- it has been reliable and made me money.

Over the past few years I have upgrade the video card and installed a SSD drive but hat is about it.

 

Recently I have noticed that when running X10 on occasion it will blue screen restart-

Slower scroll in and out with cad files.

Etc....

Other programs are having issues as well- old version of outlook is acting quirky.

 

Not that I am looking for an excuse to spend money but I feel like it is time for an entirely new machine.

 

Dell has something like this for 1800.00

  • 8th Generation Intel® Core™ i7 Processor
  • Windows 10 Home
  • NVIDIA® GeForce® RTX 2070 OC
  • 128GB Solid State Drive + 2TB Hard Drive
  • 16GB Memory
The Alienware Aurora includes a 128GB SSD + 2TB hard drive. 

 

does it sound like I am thinking in the right direction?

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One note-

I understand home construction and CA- not heavy computer lingo-, take it easy on me :P

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58 minutes ago, RL-inc said:

One note-

I understand home construction and CA- not heavy computer lingo-, take it easy on me :P

 

Lot depends on budget but I would suggest a 500GB NVME SSD ( not SATA SSD) minimum, as they are 4x faster and you'll want way more space than 128gb on your Primary Drive as win10 is sucking a 1/3 or more off that alone nowadays.

 

you can likely get by with a 1TB HDD for storage unless you have an extensive Movie and other Media Library, though it may not save you much to change it and it is good to have extra space for doing backups etc too, eg doing an Image of C:\Drive a few times a week in case there is a crash.

 

16GB Ram may do it ....but I'd still suggest 32GB especially since you seem to keep your systems for a few years

 

I read yesterday MSI has a new desktop out too , so that maybe worth looking at too....

 

M.

 

*** edit it seems Dell has a discount on the 512GB NVME+2TB HDD ATM of $150 ,so with the extra RAM (32) it's about $2179 ( No software except Win10 Home)

 

.

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I've been considering moving to a desktop in the next year and had my eye on the mid tower Slade from Digital Storm

Can be configured close in price to the Dell or there are more options and generally better components:

available 9th gen CPU, faster ram, better MOBO standard, better SSDs ( SSD M.2 (500GB Samsung 970 EVO) (NVM Express) standard, power and cooling options.

In the long run you might spend a bit more-if and how much you can decide.

Since all those options can be daunting you can either fill out a form to email for advice or call and talk to a human for help with configuration. Worth a look anyway, I mean if you're gonna keep this one for seven years might as well investigate a little :)

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I'd get an upgrade to a 500gb NVMe drive.  Many times faster, and 128mb is way too small.  16gb is a fair amount of memory, but check if it has 2 memory slots or 4.  Assuming the system comes with 2 8gb ram modules, 4 slots allows you to upgrade without replacing your existing ram.  

 

Also check the clock speed on the CPU.  Faster is better, but comes at a price.  If you ever want to overclock your system, you will need to check that both the CPU and motherboard support this.

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28 minutes ago, MarkMc said:

I've been considering moving to a desktop in the next year and had my eye on the mid tower Slade from Digital Storm

Can be configured close in price to the Dell or there are more options and generally better components:

available 9th gen CPU, faster ram, better MOBO standard, better SSDs ( SSD M.2 (500GB Samsung 970 EVO) (NVM Express) standard, power and cooling options.

In the long run you might spend a bit more-if and how much you can decide.

Since all those options can be daunting you can either fill out a form to email for advice or call and talk to a human for help with configuration. Worth a look anyway, I mean if you're gonna keep this one for seven years might as well investigate a little :)

 

Well wonders will never cease ...MarkMc with a desktop..... :)

 

Looks like most of there STD configs come with fairly low end GPU's , so expect to add $300? to prices quoted after reconfiguring.

 

I prefer to build my own but it is often hard to beat some of the Deals places like Dell and Lenovo etc have for similar Configs.

 

MSi's new ones are the Trident 9th and Infinite 9th Series

 

https://www.msi.com/Desktop/Products#?tag=Trident-Series

 

https://www.msi.com/Desktop/Products#?tag=Infinite-Series

 

 

 

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Here is a build yer own spec from newegg.  Thes prices are in CAD so will be around $1600 USD at today's rates.  Add for an OS and you are pretty close to that dell system.  My list has a 750 watt PSU, while prebuilt systems usually go with the minimum wattage they can get away with.  My list also includes the nvme drive.  

 

EDIT:  It was pointed out that I had two CPU's in the list, so the adjusted price is $1,662 CAD or $1,250 USD

 

Newegg.ca - Newegg shopping upgraded ™.pdf

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2 hours ago, Kbird1 said:

but it is often hard to beat some of the Deals places like Dell and Lenovo etc have for similar Configs.

The Dell offers the current GPU but slower RAM, no name SSD, lesser Mobo and only last gen CPU; not really a deal to me.

If I were budgeting I'd sooner have newer pipeline and settle for last gen GPU since until software makes use of RTX features. Which is likely after the next generation is out and you'll have a base system that will keep up. 

 

I said "considering " ;)

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14 hours ago, MarkMc said:

I said "considering " ;)

 

True ...I still think you get more horsepower for the same dollars in a desktop , so unless you need a Laptop to work , I still think a well spec'd desktop is going to see you through better , without the heat and other issue inherent in most Laptops today....

 

Like you, I think you are always going to be giving up a little buying a "Deal" from a name brand like Dell , there is a reason they can sell at lower Prices, you just have to decide if it "good enough" for you......and if only running Windows and Chief in the Office, perhaps they will do just fine, I just wouldn't expect to be able to upgrade one as easily as Custom Built PC.

 

The "same" hardware , doesn't mean the same performance unfortunately , an example I saw of this yesterday was the 2060 RTX card in a MSI laptop preforming and only about 75% of it's desktop counterpart, though this is the kind of thing most wouldn't know about, without doing a  lot of research or having a general interest in Computer Hardware....

 

M.

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31 minutes ago, Kbird1 said:

.I still think you get more horsepower for the same dollars in a desktop

I was surprised to find that what I want costs about the same between Digital Storm desktop and an HID laptop.

Heat will be better but then I've not had issues with the Sager. 

 

Most laptops are coming with a different  RTX card than what goes into desktops, there are a few exceptions.

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Thanks all for the info-

I have emailed my computer guy and gave him a link to look over this thread.

I don't have any issue spending 2500+ to get a solid machine that will run CA powerfully for the next 5+ years.

As with most of you, this is my business and good tools are worth paying for.;)

 

 

 

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40 minutes ago, RL-inc said:

Thanks all for the info-

I have emailed my computer guy and gave him a link to look over this thread.

I don't have any issue spending 2500+ to get a solid machine that will run CA powerfully for the next 5+ years.

As with most of you, this is my business and good tools are worth paying for.;)

 

 

 

 

If you have a "Guy" he can likely build you a better machine than the Dell for $2200-2500 and it should be more Up-gradable in the Future too.

 

The Slade , Mark pointed you to,  didn't look bad and appears to use Standard Parts (vs Dell proprietory perhaps?) , I just thought it'd need a better GFX Card , so would be in that price range too with a 2070RTX... (RTX Cards have no advantage in CA , so you could save a few bucks and get a new Gen. GFX card once CA catches up....my 1070ti seems to work just fine for example)

 

M.

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great advice-

I will post the specs on what we come up with before i order

 

Thanks

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Building your own system is the best option - its very easy with todays tech and you get 2x the system for the same price.

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I've had 3 Dell systems over the years and have found them to be highly reliable, performance competitive and cost competitive to similarly configured systems. Dell is very accommodating and if you wish to have a specific brand of say graphics card you just need to talk to them. If you check out product comparison reviews most Dell systems such as their Alienware series are right up there with the best of them. At their list prices they can be a bit pricey but you just need to keep checking and sooner or later they will offer a deal that's hard to beat. You can purchase the system outright or lease to own if you prefer a monthly payment program, systems are fully warranted and you can return it if your not satisfied.

 

Can one do better with a true custom build? I'm certain it is possible but the person configuring the system needs to be highly knowledgeable in the specific software you are using in order to make the right component choices. Unfortunately most custom builders have no experience with CA and as such I'm not sure how they can make highly specific recommendations to ensure you are getting the best performance for the dollars being spent.

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12 hours ago, johnny said:

Building your own system is the best option - its very easy with todays tech and you get 2x the system for the same price.

Have built quite a few systems myself and am actually surprised at the true cost of components only. Top of the line Vid cards for $1000 and CPU's for $500 eats up $1500 just to get started. Throw in a nice MoBo for $250 ish M2 hard drive for another $250 and you're at $2000 really quickly. Have no idea about today's machine's performance but last time I upgraded my vid card and dual Xeon CPU's I saw zero REAL WORLD performance increase in Chief. Probably the Xeons but still, very hesitant to upgrade or at least will keep expectations very low if  when the time comes.

 

 

 

Newegg.ca - 8700 WISH LIST.pdf

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On 4/8/2019 at 1:22 AM, johnny said:

Building your own system is the best option - its very easy with todays tech and you get 2x the system for the same price.

You had me curious, 50% savings would add a another reason for me to get a desktop over a laptop and be able to do so sooner than I plan.

So I tried two versions- both 9700k.

A) Digital Storm base config at $1924 -few upgrades made it $2300; identical on Partspicker was $1902-savings $375 or 18%

B) more upgrades- GPU, Optane ssd to replace the Samsung 970 Evo Pro, power supply, MOBO, cooling, DS $3800, PP $2900-savings $900 or 25%

Almost a grand on the high end system is attractive.

 

Aside from assembling it yourself, you give up (or do yourself) stress test, lifetime tech support, 3 years labor and 1 yr parts, OS installed, and the DS system has both processors overclocked and checked at NC on either version.

 

Looks like it's a balance between hourly rate and cost savings. Pretty sure I could do it but I doubt that I could: unpack,sort everything (does PP send along a diagram for novices), plan it out, assemble it, install the OS, overclock, and  check everything in a day. Likely those with experience could. Otherwise I guess if you just enjoy doing it, or want to learn. (or don't have enough regular work :)

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2 hours ago, MarkMc said:

You had me curious, 50% savings would add a another reason for me to get a desktop over a laptop and be able to do so sooner than I plan.

So I tried two versions- both 9700k.

A) Digital Storm base config at $1924 -few upgrades made it $2300; identical on Partspicker was $1902-savings $375 or 18%

B) more upgrades- GPU, Optane ssd to replace the Samsung 970 Evo Pro, power supply, MOBO, cooling, DS $3800, PP $2900-savings $900 or 25%

Almost a grand on the high end system is attractive.

 

Aside from assembling it yourself, you give up (or do yourself) stress test, lifetime tech support, 3 years labor and 1 yr parts, OS installed, and the DS system has both processors overclocked and checked at NC on either version.

 

Looks like it's a balance between hourly rate and cost savings. Pretty sure I could do it but I doubt that I could: unpack,sort everything (does PP send along a diagram for novices), plan it out, assemble it, install the OS, overclock, and  check everything in a day. Likely those with experience could. Otherwise I guess if you just enjoy doing it, or want to learn. (or don't have enough regular work :)

There are some very informative videos on youtube about how to build a PC.  Everything is basic plug in, nothing complex at all.  Unless you have overclocked before I'd suggest not doing it yourself, and any high end i7 or equivalent cpu should do fine without it. 

 

Building your own pc is kind of a hobby/enthusiast thing, so if you arent into spending a saturday putting it together and trouble shooting, best buy a pre built untit.

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4 hours ago, MarkMc said:

You had me curious, 50% savings would add a another reason for me to get a desktop over a laptop and be able to do so sooner than I plan.

So I tried two versions- both 9700k.

A) Digital Storm base config at $1924 -few upgrades made it $2300; identical on Partspicker was $1902-savings $375 or 18%

B) more upgrades- GPU, Optane ssd to replace the Samsung 970 Evo Pro, power supply, MOBO, cooling, DS $3800, PP $2900-savings $900 or 25%

Almost a grand on the high end system is attractive.

 

Aside from assembling it yourself, you give up (or do yourself) stress test, lifetime tech support, 3 years labor and 1 yr parts, OS installed, and the DS system has both processors overclocked and checked at NC on either version.

 

Looks like it's a balance between hourly rate and cost savings. Pretty sure I could do it but I doubt that I could: unpack,sort everything (does PP send along a diagram for novices), plan it out, assemble it, install the OS, overclock, and  check everything in a day. Likely those with experience could. Otherwise I guess if you just enjoy doing it, or want to learn. (or don't have enough regular work :)

I had a similar reaction to today's prices per NewEgg or Partspicker versus a pre-configured system. $375 is not worth the time for me to build the system myself but $900 gets a lot more interesting.  I do seem to remember more substantial savings through NewEgg etc. in the past but maybe I didn't consider my time quite as valuable back then.

 

BTW Rod, your NewEgg price had (2) CPU's listed in the total. Just a head's up.

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I bought an Alienware Aurora about 9 months ago and it's worked great. I spent about $2,300. The specs are below.

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18 hours ago, HumbleChief said:

I had a similar reaction to today's prices per NewEgg or Partspicker versus a pre-configured system. $375 is not worth the time for me to build the system myself but $900 gets a lot more interesting.  I do seem to remember more substantial savings through NewEgg etc. in the past but maybe I didn't consider my time quite as valuable back then.

 

BTW Rod, your NewEgg price had (2) CPU's listed in the total. Just a head's up.

That's newegg for you.  It takes 5 minutes to update the list, so you are never sure if you added it and end up adding it again.

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On 4/10/2019 at 8:20 AM, KervinHomeDesign said:

That's newegg for you.  It takes 5 minutes to update the list, so you are never sure if you added it and end up adding it again.

The NewEgg pdf I posted above was from the Canadian NewEgg site. DOH, didn't even know there was such a thing. Was wondering why the prices seemed so high. I'm going to reconfigure another system.

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10 minutes ago, HumbleChief said:

The NewEgg pdf I posted above was from the Canadian NewEgg site. DOH, didn't even know there was such a thing. Was wondering why the prices seemed so high. I'm going to reconfigure another system.

Haha, yeah we have our oen Amazon site and a few others too.  How did you get there from a US ip address?

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1 minute ago, KervinHomeDesign said:

Haha, yeah we have our oen Amazon site and a few others too.  How did you get there from a US ip address?

Have no idea and am sure I couldn't get there again if I tried...

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On 4/9/2019 at 9:35 AM, MarkMc said:

You had me curious, 50% savings would add a another reason for me to get a desktop over a laptop and be able to do so sooner than I plan.

So I tried two versions- both 9700k.

A) Digital Storm base config at $1924 -few upgrades made it $2300; identical on Partspicker was $1902-savings $375 or 18%

B) more upgrades- GPU, Optane ssd to replace the Samsung 970 Evo Pro, power supply, MOBO, cooling, DS $3800, PP $2900-savings $900 or 25%

Almost a grand on the high end system is attractive.

 

Aside from assembling it yourself, you give up (or do yourself) stress test, lifetime tech support, 3 years labor and 1 yr parts, OS installed, and the DS system has both processors overclocked and checked at NC on either version.

 

Looks like it's a balance between hourly rate and cost savings. Pretty sure I could do it but I doubt that I could: unpack,sort everything (does PP send along a diagram for novices), plan it out, assemble it, install the OS, overclock, and  check everything in a day. Likely those with experience could. Otherwise I guess if you just enjoy doing it, or want to learn. (or don't have enough regular work :)

 

I just built a 9900k system for my home office where my build was about $1700 and the closest thing I could come to that spec was $4k.  However, I shopped parts on discount etc and even purchased a brand new video card (unopened) via craigslist.  Your point about your own time being accounted for makes sense, but I find that knowing how to build and fix your own systems is superior to relying on others and having down-time.

 

When rare issue comes up, I can fix or replace a part quickly since I know the system so well...and all the parts have warranties.

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