johnny

Foundation/Wall detail - Conc Skirt

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Hello - I have a project I am working on where we've conceptualized a concrete skirt (exposed) around the perimeter of the house - its a modern design.  I feel the only way to make it work in Chief is to just falsify the visual and then make 2D adjustments for sections/details.

 

I was curious if anyone had an idea to make this actually work with the wall tools.

foundation_section.jpg

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15 minutes ago, solver said:

ct1.thumb.png.d5c4305f3fdd4782cc4e447cbc09bd6c.png

awesome - thank you.

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Could it be done with a pony wall and molding as well? Setting up the molding to flush out with the lower wall?

 

Was just a thought,  not at my computer at the moment.

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7 minutes ago, rgardner said:

Could it be done with a pony wall and molding as well?

 

That's a pony wall. Room Divider on the bottom.

 

I'm sure there will be foundation problems ...

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6 minutes ago, solver said:

 

That's a pony wall. Room Divider on the bottom.

 

I'm sure there will be foundation problems ...

I guess I was thinking making the lower pony a 12” wide poured stem wall with a molding making the chamfer section of the wall splitting the pony wall and then setting the wall as a foundation wall to set your footing position and size... 

 

just a thought haven’t tried it yet.

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17 hours ago, johnny said:

 

I was curious if anyone had an idea to make this actually work with the wall tools.

 

foundation_section.jpg

 

Seems to be do-able with the Wall Tools, have not built a whole house so.........

 

but with some Custom Wall Types and a Custom Molding Profile for the Wall Cap it looks good.  ( only an Architect could come up with an angle like 47.8° :) ) .

 

It needs a little bit of work in the Cross section to adjust the Auto Detail CAD boxes but it's minimal for the Molding Chamfer and the fact Chief places 2 boxes for the Insulation due to the use of pony walls. I assumed the Walls would have Siding and Drywall .........

 

all done in X12 Beta as an X12 Test...

 

image.thumb.png.7fac860ae53556fec1ee1a63542e293a.png image.thumb.png.821fbc533e5bce0b6d842ee3bce53e22.png 

 

 

image.thumb.png.0752c7ccf12b6df426ecd4334d33e60e.pngimage.thumb.png.e09bec43699ad0fabdd55336b3efcdd3.png  

 

image.thumb.png.d31888248bb93ec92d77d1e40149548b.png image.thumb.png.8d057d1a757d452eecb83700707c7999.pngimage.thumb.png.d0788f6b0a239b512c3e598ce028eb9b.png

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Why is the concrete stem wall offset on the footing?

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3 minutes ago, parkwest said:

Why is the concrete stem wall offset on the footing?

 

Johnny will need to answer that ...but maybe to counteract "Tip Out" (over) forces similar to a retaining Wall.

 

M.

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6 minutes ago, Kbird1 said:

 

Johnny will need to answer that ...but maybe to counteract "Tip Out" (over) forces similar to a retaining Wall.

 

M.

Maybe it is being built in an area with expansive soil... but I would think the floor slab would take care of that problem???

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4 minutes ago, parkwest said:

Maybe it is being built in an area with expansive soil... but I would think the floor slab would take care of that problem???

 

The Slab is not sitting on the Footing nor is it "connected" to the stem walls due to the interior rigid insulation, the Slab is basically "floating" inside the Stemwalls , though personally I like to see rebar "pins" connecting them , having seen more than one example of (interior) slabs that have sunk over the years due to poor site preparation , ie no or little compaction. ( I assume ).

 

M.

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12 minutes ago, Kbird1 said:

 

The Slab is not sitting on the Footing nor is it "connected" to the stem walls due to the interior rigid insulation, the Slab is basically "floating" inside the Stemwalls , though personally I like to see rebar "pins" connecting them , having seen more than one example of (interior) slabs that have sunk over the years due to poor site preparation , ie no or little compaction. ( I assume ).

 

M.

 

Thanks Mick

 

I was thinking of lateral forces pushing inward on the stemwall...

 

Hopefully Johnny will let us know...  just curious.  :-)

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6 minutes ago, parkwest said:

 

Thanks Mick

 

I was thinking of lateral forces pushing inward on the stemwall...

 

Hopefully Johnny will let us know...  just curious.  :-)

 

Okay I was thinking tipping out  <  due to Roof/Wall Loads  eg Snow....

 

M.

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15 hours ago, solver said:

ct1.thumb.png.d5c4305f3fdd4782cc4e447cbc09bd6c.png

Clever idea to use a wall cap to get the shape Eric, but curious why it does not show up as a separate piece?

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5 minutes ago, DzinEye said:

Clever idea to use a wall cap to get the shape Eric, but curious why it does not show up as a separate piece?

 

 it's one piece, 12" x 48",  and set to negative offsets with his method....

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15 hours ago, solver said:

That's a pony wall. Room Divider on the bottom.

Erick has the Room Divider on the bottom portion.

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5 minutes ago, Kbird1 said:

 

 it's one piece, 12" x 48",  and set to negative offsets with his method....

Ahh.. I glanced at that too quickly... I just saw 'wall cap' and assumed that only accounted for the very top shape without looking at the dimensions.
So you said 'with his method'... what method did you use?

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22 minutes ago, DzinEye said:

So you said 'with his method'... what method did you use?

 

I used pony walls and just made the cap the chamfered part , all settings are above I think....

 

M.

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1 hour ago, Kbird1 said:

Slab is basically "floating" inside the Stemwalls , though personally I like to see rebar "pins" connecting them , having seen more than one example of (interior) slabs that have sunk over the years due to poor site preparation , ie no or little compaction. ( I assume ).

 

This is actually a really really good argument against pinning the slab to the foundation walls.  If the slab settles and it wasn't designed to carry its own weight over the span of the floor system, then its just going to end up breaking.  Might even cause a big step in the slab somewhere if it settles enough.  Better to just let the slab settle with the substrate if you ask me.  

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15 minutes ago, Kbird1 said:

I used pony walls and just made the cap the chamfered part , all settings are above I think....

I looked at your settings before posting,  which showed how you did the walls, but didn't see anything about the cap.  Sorry if I missed it.  Nice job on that detail though!
 

11 minutes ago, Alaskan_Son said:

This is actually a really really good argument against pinning the slab to the foundation walls. 

Yep, that's my understanding and practice as well.  Though you may want to pin a landing area in some cases. 

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34 minutes ago, DzinEye said:

I looked at your settings before posting,  which showed how you did the walls, but didn't see anything about the cap.  Sorry if I missed it.  Nice job on that detail though!
 

Yep, that's my understanding and practice as well.  Though you may want to pin a landing area in some cases. 

 

In the Detail I pulled the Wall CAD Box ( concrete ) up and chamfered the Corner , to cover the "Wall Cap" Outline , I  added another pic to Clarify... 

 

I was actually taught the other way many years ago, and so take these new "modern details" with a grain of salt sometimes, but I do love the 4" of foam under Slabs these days myself , it does make a difference. Of course, if I am doing the Site Prep it's another matter but in the example I used above I had to tear the main floor Slabs out of two side by side Townhouses as the slabs had sunk to various degrees in different spots upto 3 inches in one corner so they couldn't even put there furniture against the walls due to the 8" stemwall ( 2x4 framed). As it turned out the "Spec" builder ( a Plumber ) had backfilled with the topsoil off the site as he didn't want to pay to haul it away...... and then put a thin layer of sand on top to cover it up,  but I have also see numerous other issues over the years from poor prep.

 

M.

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I missed a setting.

 

ct1.png.39aec723971476e16af9dbb1378bfe8a.png

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On 1/25/2020 at 10:30 AM, parkwest said:

Why is the concrete stem wall offset on the footing?

 

Honestly it was just a quick sketch and I never re-aligned the footing since I was trying to focus on the upper area.  The real footing would typically be centered unless the wall height increased and we needed to cantilever the footing.

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8 hours ago, johnny said:

 

Honestly it was just a quick sketch and I never re-aligned the footing since I was trying to focus on the upper area.  The real footing would typically be centered unless the wall height increased and we needed to cantilever the footing.


You had us guessing on that one. :-)

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Thank you to everyone who gave input here - helped a lot.

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