Exterior Molding


SketchB
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7 hours ago, SketchB said:

How can I apply molding on the exterior part of the wall?

 

Several ways. When asking how, it helps to know what you are trying to accomplish. Posting images with a good description is often good.

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I hope the attached will give you some understanding. The RED pointers pointing in the direction where i would like to add an exterior crown all the way around the building at the top edge, in addition to a lower band as indicated. The BROWN pointers shows where i would like to create an indent line across the exterior wall and would like to know how to. Hope you will be able to help now. TY

Exterior Crown.bmp

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The crown should be able to be controlled by the roof plane Frieze Molding if you have roofs. Then the banding can be done with a wall material region.  Post the plan and Eric or I will have a go.  Also when posting images .jpg works much better.

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I used an exterior room molding polyline for the top crown which works well and then some wall material regions for the banding which is a little tricky at the outside corners and then I had an issue with the crown at the corner and it did not work out so well.  Maybe Eric will have a better suggestion there.

 

Outside Corner Crown.jpg

 

Wall crown band Chopped.plan

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Here is a 3D molding Polyline drawn in elevation view to match the angle on the front and then extended in plan view, copied and mirrored over to the other side of the room.  Not a great looking miter, but maybe this it the problem Grahm was taking about here:

 

https://chieftalk.chiefarchitect.com/topic/18027-moldings/?do=findComment&comment=150671

 

"From my playing around it's as if you only have a miter saw, so anything requiring a compound miter seems to be out of the question."

 

Outside Corner Crown 3D polyline.jpg

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Chopsaw,

 

For the crown molding, I think you need to do this.

Isn't that how you would do it in real life?

I don't think you could ever get those moldings (one on the horizontal and one on the angle) to miter on a corner.

This crown molding is drawn with one 3D Molding line.

 

New Image_2.jpg

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That looks fine Glenn. Did you break it in elevation view and straighten out the end bit before going around the corner ?  Still working on my trim carpentry skills but I think that is a difficult one in real life.

 

Curious if you were able to keep the line joined at the peak ?

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2 hours ago, Chopsaw said:

Curious if you were able to keep the line joined at the peak ?

 

No problem.

That only took 3 seconds to do.

 

I started with the left side elevation and drew the horizontal 3d Molding Line, went around the corner in plan view and then dragged a new line segment up the gable.

Lastly dragged a new line segment down the other side of the gable.

No need to do any breaking.

The trick with 3D Molding Lines is to always draw them in a cameral view that is perpendicular to the molding line.

 

I think this way is the best way to do it in real life and Chief - funny about that.

 

New Image_3.jpg

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8 hours ago, Chopsaw said:

Here is a 3D molding Polyline drawn in elevation view to match the angle on the front and then extended in plan view, copied and mirrored over to the other side of the room.  Not a great looking miter, but maybe this it the problem Grahm was taking about here:

 

https://chieftalk.chiefarchitect.com/topic/18027-moldings/?do=findComment&comment=150671

 

"From my playing around it's as if you only have a miter saw, so anything requiring a compound miter seems to be out of the question."

 

Outside Corner Crown 3D polyline.jpg

 

Yes that's the issue. To do that type of connection in real life you would need to do a compound miter, cut two angles at the same time. The 3D Molding tool can only cut one angle.

 You can get fairly close by inserting a transition piece such as Glenn did. I have done this and it you set the line length of the transition piece really low, say 1/16" or 1/8" it is barley noticeable. Depending on the angles two transition pieces may need to be used.

 

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The compound miter problem is unfortunate.  It results from the fact that the molding profile is always horizontal/vertical.  If there was a way for Chief to know that the profile should be rotated to a specific angle on any given segment then compound miters could be done.

 

If the profile is round and it's offset vertically & horizontally by -1/2 the diameter then they will miter very close to correctly.  Actually they should miter exactly but there is evidently a miscalculation in the software so the miters don't quite meet.  If the profile size is small enough it might be "close enough". ;)

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Had to do something along these lines for a pediment once, another time for cathedral ceiling. IRL I once did installed the exterior crown on a Carpenter Gothic with tons of these. Made my head hurt. I had a couple of little programs that worked out the cuts and I'd go home at night and try to work corners out, getting the angles and the math made my head hurt. This was before digital was common so I relied on t-bevels and foam core. The worst was getting around the copper drains that were already installed.

When I did this in Chief last time it was something like real life. Made the molding flat first, converted to a millwork symbol and rotated. The pediment was easier thanks to the gap between the sides. (wonder if that's how that developed to begin with?) 

Here I took those symbols and adjusted the stretch zones so I could "lop off" the ends and put them together. I'd only bother to do this on a model if dimensions were settled since you have to work them all out ahead of time, and it was really important (there's there's also my tendency to be a weenie).

 

Note that I had issues getting the blocks correct which made it less workable fitting it to walls. But this was a quickie.

 

Pediment parts.png

On a wall.png

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