Top Elevation of a "Fixture"


robdyck
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How can I access the data for the top elevation of a fixture? Object properties lists the bottom, but not the top. In this instance I've got a schedule of helical piles and the top is a known and critical elevation whereas the bottom is undetermined and unimportant. I typed that info in manually for now...because Chief won't let me make a helical pile into what ever I want it to be. I suppose I could've use "framing-posts-steel round"...But if Chief would allow me to convert my helical piles into actual piles that would hold to the center of the fdn wall and populate into a schedule...how sweet it could be!

image.thumb.png.2480c6b39d417539fe6a4a8566fa0447.pngimage.thumb.png.6a427b425eefbfc2197e2201d1ef585b.png

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It is. I don't know how to write that into a field so I can include it in my schedule. I'm using the comment field for the top elevation in my schedule. I entered these values manually as a group. Unfortunately we can;t properly use the match properties tool for fixtures either...but I digress.

image.thumb.png.b7730da113f3797392167a584da84959.png

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2 hours ago, robdyck said:

It is. I don't know how to write that into a field so I can include it in my schedule. I'm using the comment field for the top elevation in my schedule. I entered these values manually as a group.

 

Hi Rob,  Just learning a bit of ruby so I though I would give this a try for you.  Added in a correction for the saddle depth unless you already did that with the symbol bounding box.  Let me know if this works.

 

top elevation of Pile for Rob.json

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35 minutes ago, Chopsaw said:

 

Hi Rob,  Just learning a bit of ruby so I though I would give this a try for you.  Added in a correction for the saddle depth unless you already did that with the symbol bounding box.  Let me know if this works.

 

top elevation of Pile for Rob.json


Away from my computer so I could only read the text file, but that looks good Chop.  You did a good job keeping it simple too.

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14 minutes ago, Alaskan_Son said:

Away from my computer so I could only read the text file, but that looks good Chop.  You did a good job keeping it simple too.

 

I did not know you could do that and it looks nasty in Notepad so thanks for the tip and complement I guess.;)

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1 hour ago, Chopsaw said:

Hi Rob,  Just learning a bit of ruby so I though I would give this a try for you.  Added in a correction for the saddle depth unless you already did that with the symbol bounding box.  Let me know if this works.

Thanks so much Chop! I could never get there on my own!

In return, I offer my library items of 3 Screw Piles.

 

Screw Piles.calibz

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9 minutes ago, robdyck said:

In return, I offer my library items of 3 Screw Piles.

 

Screw Piles.calibz

 

Thanks Rob,  Nice job on the modeling.  Are those a generic screw pile or specific to a manufacturer ?  Nice job on the screw also, was that modeled in Chief ?

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2 minutes ago, Chopsaw said:

 

Thanks Rob,  Nice job on the modeling.  Are those a generic screw pile or specific to a manufacturer ?  Nice job on the screw also, was that modeled in Chief ?

Found them on 3d warehouse and then added the caps and the plates myself.

They very closely resemble the products from:

https://www.technometalpost.com/en-CA/

 

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3 minutes ago, Chopsaw said:

 

Nice job on the screw also, was that modeled in Chief ?

I could have made those though, just not as quickly! You can use a spiral stair for the screw, believe it or not.

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Interesting work gents...

 

In Missouri and here in Florida, I've worked with slab/crawl and full basements has foundations, never a helical screw.  When would a helical screw be needed?  Even on the beach here its on concrete or wood pilings, about 15' off grade depending on the area.  

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31 minutes ago, mtldesigns said:

When would a helical screw be needed? 

 

It is a little different here in the north. We don't normally use wood underground and concrete needs to be flanged to prevent frost heave.  Depending on the site conditions and access sometimes it just makes sense to use screws.  It is typically a little more money but a lot faster and a lot less soil disturbance if it is in a sensitive area.  It takes a while to dig 60 holes by hand and it makes quite a mess to do it with a machine then you need to fill them all back in with cement...   Ug....

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Didn't know that.. learn something everyday.  So using the screw requires no digging or concrete, or you still need to do that too?  

 

Here I thought all houses up north looked like this... eh!

 

As always, your very helpful Chop

unnamed.jpg

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11 minutes ago, mtldesigns said:

So using the screw requires no digging or concrete, or you still need to do that too? 

 

That is the ticket right there.  No Digging.  No Concrete.

 

Nice vacation photo from Anchorage.  That is definitely a unique structure.  Hotel and ski hill all in one.:unsure:

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12 hours ago, mtldesigns said:

Interesting work gents...

 

In Missouri and here in Florida, I've worked with slab/crawl and full basements has foundations, never a helical screw.  When would a helical screw be needed?  Even on the beach here its on concrete or wood pilings, about 15' off grade depending on the area.  

I'll add a bit to what Chop said about the use of screw piles. In my project, pictured above, the house is situated relatively close to a lake and the ground is known to have a high water table. While not impossible, it is difficult to drill holes and pour concrete without the holes filling with water. The screw piles simply screw into the ground, and shafts lengths are added until the screw hits a specific torque setting as prescribed by the project engineer (often the screw pile manufacturer would have an engineer on staff as well).

Assuming cost and availability aren't an issue they can also be a great option for deck piles and renovations as they create almost no damage to a finished landscape. Great for temporary structures that require a foundation, retaining walls that require diagonal anchors into the earth, and soil conditions that don't have the bearing capacity for traditional footings.

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