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Which Universities offer Architecture Studies via Chief Architect Software

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Hello,

 

I have been creating house plans using Chief Architect since summer 2019 without a "Architect License" but rather with experience in the construction industry and Chief Architect Training Videos and Coaches.  I have many custom house plans under my belt and have helped 10 property owners obtain building permits thus far in my Drafting & Design business.  

 

I would like to be able to "stamp" Plans now.  Which accredited universities teach Architecture using Chief Architect Software?  All the school's I've researched teach AutoCAD mainly (in which I have no experience in."  

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Best to contact Chief directly.

 

Do you understand what it takes to become an Architect?

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16 minutes ago, solver said:

Best to contact Chief directly.

 

Do you understand what it takes to become an Architect?

I have reached out.  They suggested go ask I'm this Forum.  Im waiting for another Department of CA to reply also.

 

I have connected with the WA State Architecture License Board.  They helped me understand the steps to obtaining an Architect license.  The fastest way is to get a Bachelor's Degree from an accredited institution.  All accredited institutions I've searched teach AutoCAD. Not one that I have found teach Chief Architect.   

 

I'd like to learn Chief Architect further from an accredited institution to be eligible for the WA Architect License.  

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I doubt you will have much luck in this venture, I am only aware of a few high schools that use the software in curriculum. It would take years for CA to be accredited curriculum for an Architects license, keep in mind it isn't just the residential sector that you have to learn to become an Architect. Drawing a few house plans is only a very very small segment of what it takes to own that $30K+ stamp. On top of a BA you need to past a host of tests and complete 1000's of NCARB hours under a licensed professional.

It's a goal of mine as well, but don't expect to have tutelage in CA, I could almost guarantee it doesn't exist.

I personally get plansets through my local county/municipalities without an architects stamp for most of the remodels and additions I draft for using the prescriptive code.

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I hope that I am missing something in your explanation. What does AutoCAD, Chief, or any other software have to do with architecture school? Granted it's been 30 years since I finished arch school, but then AutoCAD was an "elective" and not very highly attended. 

 

I'm sure...30 years later...that working with software is a part of the curriculum now, but my guess is it's a very small part. An education in architecture has very, very little to do with "drawing plans". In fact, 5 years ago I had an intern from an arch school in Michigan come home for the summer and work in my office as he was about to graduate with his B.A. and he had never put together a full set of construction documents. His school used the philosophy that the firm(s) he worked for would teach him that information. 

 

Perhaps you need to look at a Tech School or Community College for drafting classes, and go ahead and learn AutoCAD...it couldn't hurt...but if you are only looking to "stamp" plans, you are being naive as to what you are going to have to go through. Do you have any college credits heading in? If not, you are going to spend a couple years go through all the freshman and soph college classes before entering "architecture school". 

 

My opinion. This is wrong on so many levels.

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I pretty much agree with everything said by the guys above.  Learning AutoCad in addition to Chief will most likely only benefit you in the long run.  If you like doing residential work and have no desire to learn and do commercial projects, then you may want to reconsider getting an architects license.  Don't want to discourage you at all, just that it really won't do much more for you in the residential world than good old solid experience will.  I would recommend using a licensed structural engineer for all your projects. (Have your clients hire them independently).  I highly recommend working in several offices to learn the different ways things are done and give you the knowledge to put together your own best practice if that's what your goal is.  Whether or not you end up pursuing a license, I would still highly recommend you take some architectural classes in design and structure along with some art classes.  Consider starting at a community college that offers an architecture program and if you want to continue to a BA or beyond then you can transfer to a 4-year college. 
Best to you

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Architecture schools don't structure their programs around a specific piece of software. In fact, most will start you off learning how to draw by hand.  Architecture school is meat to teach you how to design and allow you to learn the technical side of the profession. The tool you choose to draw with is often up to you. I am an Adjunct Professor and teach a third year design studio at an accredited BARCH program. Most of the students in my class use Rhino, some use SketchUp, all take AutoCAD as one of their courses. 

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You may want to look into a Degree for "Architectural Technologist" instead , not sure about WA but many places also allow them to "Stamp Plans".

 

M.

 

 

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13 minutes ago, Kbird1 said:

You may want to look into a Degree for "Architectural Technologist"

 

That's a Canadian thing.

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4 hours ago, solver said:

 

That's a Canadian thing.

 

Not sure to be honest, tough it's not just in CDN, but I did assume the US had something similar.

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37 minutes ago, Kbird1 said:

but I did assume the US had something similar.

Nope. Unless you are state licensed as an architect or structural engineer, you have no "stamping" privileges. 

 

However...there are a number of jurisdictions, including HUD I think, that recognize the CPBD designation you can obtaining via the AIBD and NCBDC. 

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I feel like this is a flawed question...

 

"Which Universities offer Architecture Studies via Chief Architect Software"

 

No universities anywhere offer architecture studies via software of any kind.  Architectural degrees have nothing whatsoever to do with software.  The question is kinda like asking which universities offer law degrees using Microsoft Word.  Chief Architect is simply a tool some designers choose to use and is nothing more than a supporting class a person might take.  An architectural or engineering degree is a huge investment and requires a butt-load of prerequisites as others have mentioned.  In addition to the academic prerequisites you're looking at several more years of study and then several more years working for someone else before you'll get your so called stamping privileges.  It's no small undertaking by any means and if you ask me, "which software do you teach with?" is not even a question worth asking.  You can learn software anywhere. 

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