3D Molding Profile


kwhitt
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I created a 3D molding profile of a baseboard in an elevation view.  I am having a difficult time get the molding to return back towards the side of the wall.  No extend handle shows up in the plan view for me to move and when I move the end point it goes off in another direction.  When I move it in 3D, the molding remains on the same plane and won't return.  Any thoughts on what I might be doing wrong?  Also, the floor is not running below the door (it's a mulled unit if that matters).  Thanks!

img.jpg

crazy molding.jpg

crazy molding_02.jpg

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robdyck - thanks for the reply.  The baseboard in this case is being used as a casing around the bookcases and is to tie in with the baseboard at the floor level.  Not sure how I could draw this casing in the plan view.

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1 minute ago, kwhitt said:

robdyck - thanks for the reply.  The baseboard in this case is being used as a casing around the bookcases and is to tie in with the baseboard at the floor level.  Not sure how I could draw this casing in the plan view.

Nope. 2 options. stop the 3d molding casing before the corner and add a separate molding p-line for the baseboard.

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Any Molding can be used as a casing on an opening, a baseboard, a crown molding, etc.

  • 2D Molding Profiles act as extrusion shapes.
  • 3D Moldings represent a repeated 3D geometric object rather than an extruded shape.

A 3D Molding Polyline is a totally different animal in that it describes a path that is in more than one plane.

 

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15 minutes ago, Joe_Carrick said:

Any Molding can be used as a casing on an opening, a baseboard, a crown molding, etc.

  • 2D Molding Profiles act as extrusion shapes.
  • 3D Moldings represent a repeated 3D geometric object rather than an extruded shape.

A 3D Molding Polyline is a totally different animal in that it describes a path that is in more than one plane.

 

Joe - isn't a 3D molding profile what I want for this application?  I didn't realize the outcome was not an extruded shape.

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19 minutes ago, robdyck said:

2nd option: Tell each line where to go (and how to get there) using the dbx

image.thumb.png.619d05361d4e0f417087f768f22f419d.pngimage.thumb.png.9fdbf73cc5b4031dd6b1d4ef7896ea6f.pngimage.thumb.png.c221a0d634494986d198615bab5c385d.png

 

robdyck - thanks again.  Is it best to do this after the shape has been extruded or can it be done with the spline from the beginning (before sweeping the profile) or does it matter?

 

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7 minutes ago, robdyck said:

I made the breaks I needed in elevation view. Then, it doesn't really matter which view you use to adjust it, as long as you know your x,y,z coordinates! 

 

I don't know the X,Y,Z coordinates specifically for Chief and cannot find them in the help files.  Is there a diagram showing these from a plan view anywhere?  I have two applications that set North differently and I'm confused by your use of 90 degrees in the example.

 

Just so I understand, you drew the baseboard beyond the corner and then used the break tool at the corner to create a new segment and then moved the end point of that newly created segment via the DBX?  Thanks for your time!

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x = left - right

y = front - back

z = up - down

bottom right hand corner of your screen, watch the coordinates update as your move your cursor. And yes, I didn't really 'draw' the molding in its location, I 'specified' it's location using the dbx. A 3d molding p-line can be tricky to learn. I'd suggest stopping the 3d molding in elevation view here:

image.thumb.png.7d351c1d6694fe03792a42cfd15b2ccd.png

Then in plan view, draw a molding p-line to be your baseboard. They can overlap and it'll look seamless.

 

 

 

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Thanks again, Robdyck.  I am familiar with the standard coordinates.  I should have said polar coordinates.  For example, in AutoCAD to move in positive degrees you work counterclockwise and North is set at 0 degrees.  I think I understand your 90 degree turn now.  That was a relative coordinate - not absolute, correct?

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1 minute ago, kwhitt said:

Thanks again, Robdyck.  I am familiar with the standard coordinates.  I should have said polar coordinates.  For example, in AutoCAD to move in positive degrees you work counterclockwise and North is set at 0 degrees.  I think I understand your 90 degree turn now.  That was a relative coordinate - not absolute, correct?

It was absolute. That's all that's available in the dbx.

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So in your example, West is 90°?  Would North then be 0°? Or does is work clockwise?  Sorry if I'm not explaining myself well...  It would be great if there was a chart showing the movement in degrees...

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To find ZERO on the x/y axis in PLAN VIEW use the 'input point' tool and place a point at absolute 0. That should show you where 'things' are in your plan. Above zero is positive y, below zero is negative y.  Right of zero is positive x, left of zero is negative x.

Top of main floor subfloor should be zero Z axis. above that is positive, below that is negative.

No to N,E,S,W.

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6 hours ago, kwhitt said:

I created a 3D molding profile of a baseboard in an elevation view.  I am having a difficult time get the molding to return back towards the side of the wall.  No extend handle shows up in the plan view for me to move and when I move the end point it goes off in another direction.  When I move it in 3D, the molding remains on the same plane and won't return.  Any thoughts on what I might be doing wrong?  Also, the floor is not running below the door (it's a mulled unit if that matters).  Thanks!

img.jpg

crazy molding.jpg

crazy molding_02.jpg

 

It's really easier just to use both a room molding polyline and a 3D molding polyline and combine them at the floor.  Trying to bend a 3D molding is a pain.  So...I made a quick video. Maybe it'll help someone.

 

 

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Steve - thank you very much - very helpful.  Those techniques certainly make it easier to place than what I was attempting to do earlier.  That said, after spending the last couple of hours, I did get used to using the coordinates with 3D moldings.  I was even able to add my shoe molding as a separate piece.  Thanks to everyone again for the assistance today.

built-ins.jpg

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8 hours ago, kwhitt said:

Steve - thank you very much - very helpful.  Those techniques certainly make it easier to place than what I was attempting to do earlier.  That said, after spending the last couple of hours, I did get used to using the coordinates with 3D moldings.  I was even able to add my shoe molding as a separate piece.  Thanks to everyone again for the assistance today.

built-ins.jpg

Excellent work!

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Thanks Steve.  Not too bad for only my 2nd job!  I appreciate that everyone on this forum is so willing to help.  Chief owes a great amount of gratitude for having such a user base.

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Just to be clear here, modeling that scenario is entirely possible with a single 3D molding polyline, and without needing to manually type in coordinates (not that there’s anything wrong with that).  A few quick tips in that regard though...

 

  1. You have to be careful which views you draw and edit the molding polyline in.  You'll find that sometimes it must be done in plan view and sometimes it must be done in an elevation view.  You'll just have to play with this.
  2. My opinion...pretty much never edit these in a perspective camera view.  Only use section/elevation cameras. 
  3. Don't limit yourself to using the diamond edit handle (same line type) to drag out new sections if it's not available in your desired view.  Not there?  No problem, just draw a new 3D molding line that snaps to the end of your last 3D molding polyline.  You just need to make sure your desired molding profile (or stacked molding profile) is selected in the library when you start drawing...doing this will help ensure that the 2 sections snap together and form a single molding polyline. 
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