SNestor

Craftsman Sidelight - how?

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How would one go about creating a sidelight as shown in the pic below.  I searched the catalog...didn't find anything.  I tried to use a window...but, you can only reduce the glass size by about half...by increasing the width of the bottom sash.  Also...you don't get the raised panel.  

 

Maybe I could use a cabinet?  Hadn't thought of that until just now.  

 

If someone has a better idea let me know.

Thanks

Craftsman Sidelight.png

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I'm trying to do almost the exact same door style. The tops of my windows (sidelights) don't quite match the door height. I'm eager to see how somebody else would do this.

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There are sidelights in the library.  I was looking for theese door units a while back. More often than not the assembly is a whole unit or kit. I believe they were under doors or windows.its been a while. I think in the end I faked it and made p solids. 

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You can actually search the library for "sidelite", but I didn't see anything prarie style?  You can open the DBX and change the bottom width from default up to 38" (at least that's what I was able to do) but it doesn't match the bottom panel height on the door. You can probably model it with cad tools, but I'm not too good at that yet. I checked 3D warehouse and although they have a number of door and sidelite combo's didn't see the prarie stile.  I bet David Michael can knock one out with a blink of the eye?

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50 minutes ago, SNestor said:

Maybe I could use a cabinet?

Video from Michael in Tips is here

 

Plan file with "some parts" and examples of cabinet doors here.

 

Same principals apply. For house doors make back to match front. Since your using recessed instead of raised panels you don't have to worry about the depth of those. If you use "side panel inset" you may want to adjust the origin before adding it in there. If you make it very deep add a flat molding line (sample included) to the edge to cover where it sits back.

If you don't find them in the library.

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11 hours ago, DMDesigns said:

I have that exact door style and side lights if you want?

 

Over at ChiefTutor.com

    Page 2 of the symbols section:  http://www.chieftutor.net/symbols-page-2.html

 

I also have videos showing you how to make these doors -- http://www.chieftutor.net/symbols.html

 

Enjoy - 

Dave

 

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I would love to see that video, but it's password protected. Was that your intention?  I'm on an iPhone now so can't tell if it's a mobile related issue. 

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ChiefTutor.com has a Prime Membership area where you can access all our training videos - symbols - templates files and more. It works great on iPhone's and Google phones. 

 

We also have many free areas inside ChiefTutor.com where you can see examples and download extra files.

 

ChiefTutor.com

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Coming from the door industry, I wish Chief permitted easy selection and placement and scheduling of these entries with sidelites.  Just like a slider door, or a center-hung patio door, these entries are priced as a unit, bought and delivered as a unit, and installed as a unit.

 

I wish it was, and it isn't, but Chief should have a work method and tools that allow building this right up front as a unit.

 

Entry doors with sidelites need to have a category for spec all their own, in which we can select and choose for sizing and style and glazing and muntins for the door and its sidelites.  

 

We  should not need to do workarounds like we do now.  We should be able to do all our specification in one dialog.

 

I'm a Sketchup power user and can create just about any door one might put in a house, including matching sidelites.  I can texture them with mahogany, do exotic beveled leaded glass, Frank Lloyd Wright glass, anything one could desire.  Building a library with such door symbols, and using them, is easy and fast.  But I find it tedious to have to first treat a door-with-sidelites unit as multiple openings, and I find it unrealistic in 3D to then view a built-and-blocked unit and not see true mull post detailing.

 

 

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