Joe_Carrick

Roof Schedule

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It takes just 2 macros to create this Roof Schedule - and the Labels for the Roof Planes.  post-47-0-86795700-1432247601_thumb.jpg

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And for those who don't know what is being shown in your schedule, you should have footnotes explaining the not so obvious column values IMO. 

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I am curious as to what the information is used for.

 

Other than the obvious sq. footage area for calculating roofing material.

 

Can framing be calc'ed using this? 

 

Do the trades want you to calculate materials for them?

 

 

Andy.

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Joe:

 

Looking at your #'s tells me that your "projected area" is most likely the horizontal area taken up by each roof plane.  I am "assuming" that your "surface area" is the total 'in-plane' (sloped) area covered by each roof plane including the overhang.  Since your "framing area" values are slightly less than the surface area, I really don't know how you made that calculation.  I am "assuming" that the "overhang area" is that part of the surface area built outside of the outer main layer of the exterior walls.  But, if that is the case, then why don't the #'s add up [surface area = framing area + overhang area]? 

 

To make a long story short, I guess I really don't have a clue what "all" or "some" of your #'s mean.  That is why I thought the footnote suggestion was a good idea.  If everyone that looks at your plans with that schedule shown, do they all know exactly what the numbers mean?  Do the building departments require those specific numbers be identified on each plan?  Just curious.  I haven't had to provide those sort of roof area calc's where I do my projects so it is all a little Greek to me. :unsure:

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Joe,

 

That information is readily available for every roof plane.

Have a look at the Polyline panel of the roof dbx. 

There are also Object Specific macros available for each property, that you can use in the roof label. 

 

Joe has made a good job of gathering up the information and presenting it in a table.

 

 Perimeter - This is the length of the roof plane’s perimeter, including fascia and shadow boards, with its pitch taken into account. It does not equal the perimeter as measured in floor plan view unless the pitch is 0.

 Framing Area - This is the area of the roof plane’s framing, not including the fascia or shadow boards, with the pitch taken into account. It is slightly smaller than the Roof Surface Area as roofing typically overhangs the framing by a small amount.

 Projected Area - This is the area of the roof plane polyline, including fascia and shadow boards, as seen in floor plan view. It does not equal the Roof Surface Area unless the pitch is 0.

 Roof Surface Area - This is the area of the roof plane’s top surface, which covers the fascia and shadow boards, with the pitch taken into account.

 Overhang Area - This is the area of the roof plane’s overhang, including fascia and shadow boards, with its pitch taken into account.

 Projected Overhang Area - This is the area of the roof plane’s overhang, including fascia and shadow boards, as seen in floor plan view.

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Thanks Glenn,

 

The definitions you posted are directly from the Help File for the Roof Specification (Polyline Panel).  My schedule used the "Projected Overhang Area". 

 

All of the values were retrieved and tabulated from the corresponding Roof Plane attributes.  If I change any Roof Plane in the Plan - the Schedule is automatically updated. 

 

I added the appropriate footnotes to the Schedule.

post-47-0-30242900-1432302244_thumb.jpg

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Thanks Glenn - Joe for the definitions.

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Terrific, what is the information used for?

 

How is it used?

 

Who uses it?

 

Thank you.

 

Andy.

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In most cases only the Projected and Surface Areas are useful or needed. 

 

Some jurisdictions require these for rain water runoff analysis.  The Projected Area is considered impermeable and that will effect storm water systems.

 

The Surface Area is useful for material takeoffs - Roof Sheathing, Shingles, etc.  I'm not going to provide the Contractor a materials list - but with this information on the Plan it makes it easier for them to do their own take-off.

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What about for Additions, can we turn on and off specific roof planes as we need in the schedule

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What about for Additions, can we turn on and off specific roof planes as we need in the schedule

Sure, it's just a matter of having the macro that collects the data in the roof plane's label - or not.

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Perry,

 

I could extend this to a finer level of control - Existing, Demo, New.  All it would require would be using the appropriate line_styles.

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Joe,

 

What is the macro to set up this schedule and how do you set it up? Could you share it please or if you got the time a nice video tutorial would be really helpful.

 

Thanks in advance!

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Greg,

 

Do you have any programming experience?

Are you familiar with Ruby syntax?

 

I don't want to give away something that I spent a lot of time putting together.  I also am not really interested in teaching a Chief Ruby training course.  However, if you have a real desire to invest in learning how I could do an online meeting to explain the basics of how I accomplish this. 

 

I will be offering several packages for sale.  See my post in Offering Services https://chieftalk.chiefarchitect.com/index.php?/topic/5324-roof-area-schedule-package/.

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Greg,

 

Do you have any programming experience?

Are you familiar with Ruby syntax?

 

I don't want to give away something that I spent a lot of time putting together.  I also am not really interested in teaching a Chief Ruby training course.  However, if you have a real desire to invest in learning how I could do an online meeting to explain the basics of how I accomplish this. 

 

I will be offering several packages for sale.  See my post in Offering Services https://chieftalk.chiefarchitect.com/index.php?/topic/5324-roof-area-schedule-package/.

Thanks Joe!

 

Can't say I have much experience on Ruby syntax, but on need to know bases I have some experience with Java,HTML, and some on Intel 64 and IA-32 Architecture (self-education of course) therefore if I find the time,  I don't mind learning how to make a basic ruby entry and the reason for asking, I was just curious to know the process of how this data is being created and how and where this data is being stored and entered to get the results.... Thats all.

 

I been looking into some ruby programing but in Sketchup (which is a little different then doing % this or that% to get a area calculation, guys on the forum there always share and post entire Ruby programing scripts plugins they create, but most of the scripts they write and the plugins they create they share them for free so users can use them so I never really got into the depth of it.

 

You have a great deal of knowledge and I respect that and I hope you make a million dollars on the macros you create, I just don't need to display this sophisticated schedules and being a builder for almost 30 years and working with many different architects to whom I give my drawings which I make from scratch for a spec homes to fit onto a given building envelope and they enter all the schedules... but on the general note,  I have never seen a plan with so much information as you guys show in your schedules, or include framing details on the plans, etc, even a good friend of my was building a house  a while back (32k SF including the basement and I just looked at the plans) there is 21 Pages of layout and cross sections and 11 Pages of structural details and cross sections and there is not one note on any given area calculation other than 1st floor SF 2nd Floor SF, Basement and Garage .... I guess on the east coast we do things differently and having the Width/Length and Pitch/Overhang a few clicks on the calculator I can have the roof area and material list probably faster then it would take me to create a schedule and a note and enter it into a plan.

 

Thanks again Joe, you knowledge is always appreciated.

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