pjs-tex

importing surveys

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Hello all,

 

I am a new user, and am starting my first project. I am starting by getting my property surveyed. In my request to survey company, I am asking for the below: 

 

Boundary Survey
Tree Survey
Topo Survey
Survey of ground utilities

 

The property is pretty flat, so I am not sure if I need an elevation survey or not? If there is any other survey I would need, please let me know. 

 

Once I have these surveys, the survey company has advised they can  prepare a survey in Auto-Cad 2000 format which I believe would be a .dwg format. My second question, is how easy is it to import the above surveys into Chief architect? I am also not sure if the above surveys would be individual files for each survey, or one file that has all included. Is there an advantage in either case?

 

Looking forward to your responses

 

Kind regards

 

Paul

 

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You don't say where you are from. Different jurisdictions have different levels of "finickyness." Around where I am, even on a flat site, spot elevations are required to determine site drainage patterns. Often they will require an outline of neighboring houses with ridge heights identified. Also, if you are in a FEMA flood zone, you may need to get an elevation certificate, and design with flood zone requirements in mind. You should be clear on what sort of boundary markers will be placed, and determine if you need anything placed near the construction area to determine compliance with setback requirements, etc.

 

You will probably need to talk to the Planning Department as well as the Engineering Dept. of your jurisdiction to find out what information should be included. Usually, all of this information is included in a single AutoCAD file, but on different layers.

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A topo survey will give you elevations.

 

Richard's points are all good. So much depends on what you're planning to do with the property. Here's a list of possible stuff you may need, in no particular order:

1. Property boundaries, including any found benchmarks, rods, stakes, monuments, etc.

2. Boundaries of all existing pavement, walkways, buildings, sheds, etc. Basically, everything built on the site should be located.

3. Utilities, manholes, culverts, pedestals, poles, wells, septic vents and drain fields, etc., including invert elevations.

4. Trees that are significant, or that you know you want to keep. Don't bother with scrub trees or crap you know will be grubbed when the site is cleared/excavated.

5. Setbacks, adjacent right-of-ways, flood plain boundary, easements, ordinary high water mark (if you're on the water) etc.. Any legal encumbrances should be included.

6. Parcel data, including adjacent lots.

7. Spot elevations of grade at building corners and first floor elevation (if it's a building you plan on keeping/remodeling). If it will be torn down or left alone, don't bother with this.

 

As Richard mentioned, it depends on the local jurisdiction, the lot characteristics (substandard, waterfront, zoning district, etc.), and what you're project involves. Sometimes a title search is required, or a check with your local Register of Deeds. I recommend talking to a local professional who is familiar with the process in your area.

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Thank you all for your comments. 

 

I am Austin Texas, and I have been working with permit company to determine the citys requirements are.

 

Once I have the surveys, which will be all in one dwg file, I should be able to import in Chief architect, correct?

 

 

 

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6 hours ago, pjs-tex said:

Thank you all for your comments. 

 

I am Austin Texas, and I have been working with permit company to determine the citys requirements are.

 

Once I have the surveys, which will be all in one dwg file, I should be able to import in Chief architect, correct?

 

 

 

Yes, you can import the DWG in Chief. But what is a "permit company"? I have never heard of this. (Permit expeditors, yes.)

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The permitting company basically liaises with the city on what I can build in the site following the city's rules. This includes total square footage, setbacks and rules regarding building tree's.

 

 

 

 

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8 hours ago, pjs-tex said:

The permitting company basically liaises with the city on what I can build in the site following the city's rules. This includes total square footage, setbacks and rules regarding building tree's.

 

Wow. I wouldn't have thought you could get an actual business out of this. I usually determine all of this information in about 15 minutes of online research  - maybe with an additional phone call to the City - before moving on to the design. I don't think I could MAKE it take a whole hour, including a coffee break. But, who knows, maybe Austin has rules that are incredibly complex compared to here, with arcane rules that require in-person City visits.

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37 minutes ago, Richard_Morrison said:

Wow. I wouldn't have thought you could get an actual business out of this. I usually determine all of this information in about 15 minutes of online research  - maybe with an additional phone call to the City - before moving on to the design. I don't think I could MAKE it take a whole hour, including a coffee break. But, who knows, maybe Austin has rules that are incredibly complex compared to here, with arcane rules that require in-person City visits.

 

Hmm...I think you may be exaggerating a bit.  I can easily see the need for a business to help walk people through the permitting process.  You and I both know that the requirements and idiosyncrasies can vary from city to city and even from plan reviewer to plan reviewer.  Sometimes it can take a bit of finessing and that's simply not something just anyone can do.  It takes  knowledge, experience, and being familiar with "the game".  Not sure what all the service includes, how much the company is charging, or how complex the requirements are in the area but I can certainly see their being more value in the service than what you seem to be seeing.

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I'm just going based on what the OP says they do, i.e. basic garden-variety zoning research. Maybe they do more, but I'm certainly not going to assume that. 

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Yes, the permit offices in DC and VA and MD metro area have permit expediters

 

builders are willing to pay someone to stand in line and deal with the hassles etc

 

Lew

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Around here you can pay extra for plan check expediting , which means the plan checker just takes it home (not really, he does it at work) and gets the extra fee so now they ask you every time or it's a 3 month lag time.

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