GeneDavis

Detailing SIP jobs. Wall height points. SIP roof assemblies.

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First time dealing with con docs for a job done with SIPs.  Structural Insulated Panels.

 

What is the convention, if there is one, for dimensioning to tops of walls?  See the attached sketch, which shows a typical wall-roof junction.  This particular job will have very minimal eaves, and they will be done with applied sawn timber parts, which will be clad in galvanized steel sheet.

 

But the wall height question.  I show two points in the sketch.  One at the wall top at its outside face where the roof bears, the other above, at the roof's "baseline" point.  I specified walls for this job so that the outside face of the SIP sandwich is the outside of the wall's main layer.

 

There is no framing.  No plates.  The SIP walls are structural, and the SIP roof panels bear directly atop them.

 

Is this top of wall point where one goes to for the wall height callout or dimension?

 

post-55-0-96330600-1393471715_thumb.png

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Not entirely sure what you are asking but...

 

Imagine that you had a roof with a more typical overhang. Would it make sense to continue the measurement of the wall to the top of the roof?

 

I treat them the same as a stick framed wall.

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I guess I should have asked it this way.

 

For an SIP wall height, do you dimension to the OUTSIDE point, where the wall is shorter, or to the INSIDE point?

 

Forget the other arrow, dimensioning to the roof's "baseline."

 

But then, I suppose the SIP person doing the shop drawings will figure it out no matter how you detail it.

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Gene,

I've done several SIPS projects - I typically call out the height of the wall at the ceiling / roof juncture. That combined with the roof panel pitch lets the SIPS specifier do their job.

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This does not directly apply to your question but it is related to using SIPs.

 

In some two story home designs you will find the designer has called for the 2nd level platform (floor joists, subflooring, etc) to sit on top of the 1st level panels. Then the 2nd level panels sit on the 2nd level sub-flooring.

 

Other times the the designer will have the 2nd level platform hang from the top of the 1st level panels. Then the 2nd level panels sit on top of the 1st level panels.

 

Obviously the 1st level panels in the second case are going to be taller then the first case by the thickness of the 2nd level platform.

 

Of course you may have panels that span both levels but that's another issue entirely.

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Last 2 SIP jobs I completed the SIP company provided the details and I put them on a page.

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Gene:

 

If you haven't searched on-line yet, any SIP manufacturer should have some CAD details on all the conventional wall-to-roof connection methods that are most commonly used.  The SIPA organization may have the same sort of stuff on their website.  Generally, I agree with Milo's response.  You will likely have to detail the connections with one or more CAD details similar to the image in your 1st post.

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Not sure if anyone will be following this thread now but thought I'd ask just in case.

How do you model the framing for the top and bottom plates and that go on the ends of the panels and around window and door openings that are required for SIPs? Manually I'm assuming.

Any tricks for getting the material list to reflect the panel counts (assuming a given panel size)?

CA X8.

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