Opening Revit Files


ericepv
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I have been asked to Ray Trace some file which were created in Revit. I have been sent files in DXF, DWF, FBX & RVT. The only one I can import in X6 is DXF which does not give me 3D. My customer says that the FBX file will have everthing I need but X6 will not open it. I tried to import it into SketchUp Pro but same problem. Does anyone know of a way to get this file into a Chief compatible format?

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Hi,

 

I found doing a search that 3dsMax is the program that can open the fbx file extension.

It also looks like Sketch up has an add on extension from Simlab to import fxb.

MAy be more options out there, Blender, Maya, etc.

 

HTH

post-130-0-28182600-1417535314_thumb.jpg

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I just downloaded Blender and was able to import the FBX file which I then exported as both 3DS & OBJ. I then tried importing each as a 3D symbol but, like the DXF, I get no finishes.

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Having experienced this several times, i think that the best option is opening the original .rvt file in 3D Studio Max.

Still there's no guarantee that Chief will be able to get all the surfaces&textures properly. If you don't have 3D Max, you can download the trial version; or get help from me or other Chiefers who have 3D Max.

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