When i build a custom wainscot everything looks fine. When i add a window, however, it cuts through the wainscot all the way down to the baseboard height! Any ideas on how to stop windows from doing that?


Denzil
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I tried several methods. ! was drawing a line then using it as a reference for a 3d molding line. that didn't work. So i built it out of polyline solids in a repeating pattern at a repeating pattern at 36 inches and applied it to the room moldings tab as a new molding. its made up of 2 layers of wainscot and a trim piece at the top?

Screenshot 2021-11-24 101827.jpg

Screenshot 2021-11-24 101910.jpg

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9 hours? Yikes. Use room moldings for all the horizontal pieces.

Use a wall covering for the white recessed portion of the panel.

Use custom backsplashes for the vertical portions.

 

It should take about 9 minutes :)

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Lol I am a newbie. I am learning just not as fast as i would like, She is wanting wallcovering at the top of the wall, so can you have 2 on the same wall? one for the wainscot backing and one for the wallpaper? Thanks for the prompt reply's.

 

 

 

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Another option is to just use cabinets (they say I do this for everything :) Sequence shown below. You need to make a door symbol for the panel, just a thin slab with a Y origin offset. Cabinet has no back, is 3/4 deep, 0 depth toe, easiest to put molding there to start with, panels are side panel inset and rail and stile width is set in the default. Make one for the tall panels,image.thumb.png.24b3e2070a051e3c17161f7df5ffd034.png place a copy on each wall, then stretch to length, image.thumb.png.25b4ded94c6a6fcb8920e3b8c758e41a.pngthen split vertical as needed. image.thumb.png.d908a8e6da54ed3689bf4060abc4f3e1.png

image.thumb.png.fa3648fba7136e594de340f794f62868.png

Under windows make another.

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I think Mark's suggestion of using cabinets is a very good solution to this problem, but I also think he made it a little bit harder than is really needed.  

 

In the attached plan, I used a wall cabinet so that I did not have to worry about any toe kicks and counter tops.

 

Instead of using a custom door symbol, I just used the built in inset flat panel set to be thinner than the face frame.

 

In the plan, I have two of them where I set the left separation to 0 on right one so they would stack together more seamlessly.

 

These cabinets are fully customizable and are not using any symbols or any type of fancy work-arounds.

 

Have a look at this plan and ask more questions if you get stuck.

 

 

cabinet wainscot.png

cabinet wainscot.plan

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40 minutes ago, Dermot said:

I also think he made it a little bit harder than is really needed.

I use a toe kick set to 0 so that I can match that to the room baseboard height, Then there is no need to alter the bottom rail and/or allows for rapid change of separations on demand for the entire cabinet. I would do this even if using individual cabinets (Not to mention I think learning how to adjust symbols is a really worthwhile skill :)

I use the custom panel since it looks better in 3D views.  Standard door on left, recess symbol on right.

image.thumb.png.2a447b52c95101eb3bb674b448ceb667.pngimage.thumb.png.3f29b7450192d0990a7dbb84d818931a.png

Finally stretching it to the length of the wall eliminates the need for math if you can use an even number of panels.It does get a bit trickier than an odd number since Chief won't equalize the vertical sections so then you need math. I think it's still faster than adding individual cabinets but odd number is a pain in either case.

Attached has the panel floating in the plan.

Wainscott.zip

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I can see your point about it being easier to update the toe kick height then it is to adjust the bottom rail.

 

"I use the custom panel since it looks better in 3D views.  Standard door on left, recess symbol on right."

 

While learning how to use symbols is good, I still think this is the hard way.  Take a look at my plan.  I am using an inset panel and I have specified the panel thickness so that it is thinner than the face frame.  Looks just fine and I can even adjust the thickness to get the look I want with out having to build a new symbol (or play games with the offsets).  This is the same technique I use for any flat panel sides or backs.  The only reason I use a symbol is when I need something like a raised or beaded panel.  In the picture below, one wainscot has the panel thickness set to 1/4" and the other is set to 1/2".

 

Using one cabinet, stretching it to fill the wall, and then subdividing it is a perfectly good technique.  I think it all depends on whether or not you plan to build custom wainscoting or purchase stock components.  I would encourage you to design it the way you plan to build it.

 

inset panel thickness.png

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I am totally new so, I have tried all three solutions to the problem and a few more like I shared previously before i would even break down and ask. One reason I do that isn't pride related as much as it is i feel like i personally learn more during the struggle. Anyhow I have found advantages to all 3 being far more simplistic than my initial all nighter approach. Thanks to everyone for your help, the constant feedback and follow-ups and especially for sharing your files as I find it easier to establish a context with the solutions you provided in tact, then go and back track myself to try and teach myself a new approach. I have stumbled upon several aspects in chief that frankly seem to be difficult to understand( like plinth block...there's a check box in the dialog box but no way to apply them and they don't seem to work through "room" mode...) but I'm invested now so ill press on. Thanks again for being so generous with your time and effort. I totally did not expect that level of response and again, its greatly appreciated!

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Glad we could be of help.  There are usually several different ways to achieve the same goal but some of them may work better than others in certain situations.  

 

"...like plinth block...there's a check box in the dialog box but no way to apply them and they don't seem to work through "room" mode..."

 

Just an FYI, if you specify that a door is using plinth blocks, this will only affect the components/material list information and will not generate anything as part of the 3D model.  Not sure what you mean by "room mode" though.  Regardless, if you find things that you would like the program to do differently, like build a real plinth block to show in your camera views, you should always submit a feature request for it. The more people that ask for things, the higher up the priority list they will move.  Never assume that when something is mentioned on the Q&A forum that Chief Architect will be aware of it.  Employees will only look at the forums when they have extra time so it can be pretty sporadic.

 

You can submit feature requests on the suggestions forum here:  https://chieftalk.chiefarchitect.com/forum/8-suggestions/

 

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