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andr0id

Does sheetrock have to be taped and floated to meet code?

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So, I'm building my own house and our permit lasts 12 months or we have to pay extra for a renewal.   I'm trying to figure out must finish vs. nice to finish to close out my permit in time.

 

I'm looking at IRC R301.11.1 for fireblock materials and it explicitly says, "5) one-half-inch (12.7mm) gypsum board."  and that is all.

So does tightly butted gypsum board meet this requirement? It looks like it does to me.

 

I would very much like to install sheetrock and then tape, float and paint after we close the permit at my leisure.

 

Of course I will ask the building dept, but wanted to know if there is anything that says it MUST be taped and floated that I am overlooking.

 

Thanks!

 

 

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13 hours ago, Kiwideziner said:

If it is fire rated I would assume it requires stopping.

So, it turns out to be more complicated than that.

You have to dig deep into USG's library to find a document called Fire Rated Assemblies.

it details every possible metal, masonry or wood framed wall, ceiling and floor you could possible think of with one or more layers of sheetrock installed along with the actual UL test number.

 

Some assemblies say -joints filled some do not.

 

 

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19 hours ago, andr0id said:

So, I'm building my own house and our permit lasts 12 months or we have to pay extra for a renewal.   I'm trying to figure out must finish vs. nice to finish to close out my permit in time.

 

I'm looking at IRC R301.11.1 for fireblock materials and it explicitly says, "5) one-half-inch (12.7mm) gypsum board."  and that is all.

So does tightly butted gypsum board meet this requirement? It looks like it does to me.

 

I would very much like to install sheetrock and then tape, float and paint after we close the permit at my leisure.

 

Of course I will ask the building dept, but wanted to know if there is anything that says it MUST be taped and floated that I am overlooking.

 

Thanks!

 

 

 

It's unclear as to what type of assembly (wall or ceiling) you are referring to and what if any fire resistance rating is required. In general, a UL listed assembly must be constructed according to the description outlined in the UL Handbook. If the gypsumboard was tapped when it was tested then you must tape it which will be described as such. For listed assemblies, such as those tested by UL, it is their description that must be followed and should always be referenced regardless of the manufacturers description.

 

Obviously an occupancy certificate is much more involved and the requirements will likely vary according to your local. The other consideration is if there is a mortgage involved and if so what % value of the home is being mortgaged. Mortgage holders will have their own requirements as an incomplete home is of less value than a completed home.

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2 hours ago, TheKitchenAbode said:

Obviously an occupancy certificate is much more involved and the requirements will likely vary according to your local. The other consideration is if there is a mortgage involved and if so what % value of the home is being mortgaged. Mortgage holders will have their own requirements as an incomplete home is of less value than a completed home.

 

I will have to tape, but we can L5 later and paint. No banks to satisfy, just my life's savings.

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In my experience, you need to tape and mud all the seams to get final,  the paint is optional.  However, the best person to ask is the inspector generally you can request them to come out and walk to the property and tell you what you need to finish to get the final.  The code is a good guide but the inspector is truly the final word. 

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In some jurisdictions it is 12 months between inspections. Which means you can get the framing or rough plumbing inspected, then you have a year to drywall. I've known a few projects that carried over into a few years this way. This may work for you but there will be no occupancy certificate. 

As far as the drywall goes, only the walls that are specifically called out as a fire rated assembly (between garage and living area for example) need to follow the specific UL listed construction. For everything else 1/2" is fine. 

However without drywall you will not have finish electrical or plumbing. Not sure about the IBC but the California code -"R702.3.5.1 Screw Fastening" means you need an inspection of the drywall screws or nails. So no way to get a final without that. 

And finally kitchens and bathrooms need a smooth, non-absorbent finish. So no final without paint at least in those rooms. 

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