Question/tip about soffits sloped in two planes


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We are designing a house with a shed roof and soffits that slope up on all sides of the roof overhang (See attached screenshots and test plan). This creates a condition where the soffit going up the sides of the house must be sloped in two planes (to match the pitch of the roof, and to slope up perpendicular to the roof pitch), and has a compound miter in the corners. I am using X12, and have figured out a somewhat complicated and time consuming way to manually draw this. 

 

I'll show the method I have figured out to do this, but I'm also wondering - is there an easier way in X13? I know X13 offers a custom rafter tail on both ends of a rafter, but can it create a soffit sloped in two planes with a compound miter? 

 

Here are my steps, and it seems to only work if they are followed in this exact order: 

 

  • In a side elevation where you can see the pitch of the roof, draw the soffit as a rectangular polyline,  rotate it to match the roof pitch, and make it a polyline solid with the correct overhang depth 
  • Take a section where you are looking at the butt end of the polyline solid you have created, click on the upper edge of the butt end to get the upper rotate handle, and rotate it to match the slope of the rafter tails 
  • Miter the soffit in plan 
 
I have attached photos of the condition and a test plan with the roof framing and soffits, with a saved camera with those layers on.
 
Thanks.

Sloped Soffit 1.png

Sloped Soffit.png

Sloped Soffit Test.zip

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Might be a lot easier to do with a 3D Molding Polyline.

This will do the mitres automatically and on the whole should will be a lot easier to control.

Here is a very quick one just to give you the idea.

I have left the moulding away from the roof so you can see what is happening.

 

Or, you could try using a Frieze which would be even more automatic.

 

Screen Shot 2021-07-10 at 10.56.46 am.jpg

 

Having said that, and without going any further, I suspect that this is one of those situations where even a compound mitre will not give a clean junction between horizontal eaves and raking eaves.

Similar to this....maybe?

443993285_ScreenShot2021-07-10at11_44_37am.thumb.jpg.e2989388bf1a962ac6585845bd7ee451.jpg

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I would likely be modeling that lying flat.  Then it would be much easier to use moldings, extruded faces, or solids.  Then once you're done, rotate back up into position.  Very quick down and dirty example....

Example.thumb.jpg.ad3c7fecf8ece56f2ab3002a809b8abf.jpg

Sloped Soffit Test 2.plan

 

In the attached example, all I did was:

  1. Convert the original scene to a symbol
  2. Rotate the newly created object so that it was no longer at a pitch
  3. Draw a molding profile for the soffit
  4. Draw a molding polyline shaped to fit the flattened roof
  5. Converted the molding polyline to a symbol
  6. Rotated the new soffit symbol to match the original roof pitch
  7. Dropped the new soffit symbol into the original plan and re-positioned as necessary. 

If this was my own project I would have taken a little longer perfecting things and would have likely used solids instead of a molding polyline, but the basics remain the same.  I would have worked on a level plane and then rotated.  It's not totally necessary when working with solids and extruded faces, but its a heck of a lot easier.

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On 7/10/2021 at 6:07 PM, Alaskan_Son said:

I would likely be modeling that lying flat.  Then it would be much easier to use moldings, extruded faces, or solids.  Then once you're done, rotate back up into position.  Very quick down and dirty example....

Example.thumb.jpg.ad3c7fecf8ece56f2ab3002a809b8abf.jpg

Sloped Soffit Test 2.plan 5.61 MB · 2 downloads

 

In the attached example, all I did was:

  1. Convert the original scene to a symbol
  2. Rotate the newly created object so that it was no longer at a pitch
  3. Draw a molding profile for the soffit
  4. Draw a molding polyline shaped to fit the flattened roof
  5. Converted the molding polyline to a symbol
  6. Rotated the new soffit symbol to match the original roof pitch
  7. Dropped the new soffit symbol into the original plan and re-positioned as necessary. 

If this was my own project I would have taken a little longer perfecting things and would have likely used solids instead of a molding polyline, but the basics remain the same.  I would have worked on a level plane and then rotated.  It's not totally necessary when working with solids and extruded faces, but its a heck of a lot easier.

Thanks Michael. I don't have X13 so I can't open your test plan, but I will try using those steps. 

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On 7/9/2021 at 8:55 PM, glennw said:

Might be a lot easier to do with a 3D Molding Polyline.

This will do the mitres automatically and on the whole should will be a lot easier to control.

Here is a very quick one just to give you the idea.

I have left the moulding away from the roof so you can see what is happening.

 

Or, you could try using a Frieze which would be even more automatic.

 

Screen Shot 2021-07-10 at 10.56.46 am.jpg

 

Having said that, and without going any further, I suspect that this is one of those situations where even a compound mitre will not give a clean junction between horizontal eaves and raking eaves.

Similar to this....maybe?

443993285_ScreenShot2021-07-10at11_44_37am.thumb.jpg.e2989388bf1a962ac6585845bd7ee451.jpg

Thanks for the idea, Glenn, I will give that a try. 

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