basilbabaa

Printing Layout with Physically Based Renders

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Why this ghosting?  

Only occurs when Physically rendered content is on the layout.

Cannot seem to get these ghost images to go away.  See Page 1 of PDF.

 

Any ideas?  Thanks...

Design - David Parker.pdf

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Did you set any elevation data such as points or lines?

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Try placing an elevation region over these areas.

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Elevation region did not make a difference.  But FYI.  Turning OFF "Improve Lighting Quality" in the Physically based Rendering Technique Options removed the ghosted images from the PDF Print dialog and final PDF output.

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Glad to hear you issue is resolved. Adding terran area over glitchy items worked for me in the past. Found that in working with elevation data less is more. Also never noticed much difference between standard renders VS physical based renders. Maybe just me.

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I agree on the standard vs physical renders as far as quality...  only main difference in my case is we're color matching metal panels and the physical render tends to produce an image that more closely depicts the color of our metal manufacturer colors...

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Yeah. Run into that a lot. In the past I've used standard palette colors because they rendered better than manufacturer catalogue choice.

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How serious are you about color matching?  

XRITE Pantone is the world leader in color.  I use their i1Studio to Profile my monitor and printer.  If you use this, you can hold your prints up to your monitor and they match.

B&H sells it for $439

 

ICC is the International Color Consortium.  In 1993, they established ICC Profiles to standardize color.  They're used to calibrate everything from Computers to TVs & Television Cameras to Operating Room equipment and Textile Manufacturing equipment..

 

The i1Studio will create an ICC Profile for your computer monitor.  You hang the device in front of the monitor and it goes through a wide range of colors, measuring each one.  It then creates an ICC Profile for your monitor.  The advantage to this is that the monitor is calibrated for your room's lighting and White Balance in Degrees Kelvin.  You then select this Profile in your computer's video card driver.

 

Then you profile your printer.  It prints a sheet of colors, which you scan with the i1Studio.  It then builds an ICC Profile for that printer and that particular paper.  A new Profile must be created for each paper type.  When you print, you select that paper and ICC Profile.

 

It's possible that your monitor and printer match, BUT are you seeing the same thing the manufacturer sees?  Use ICC Profiles and you will.

This sounds complicated but it's simply to use.  After you do it once, it's easy.

 

 

 

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If you'd like to see your monitor ICC Profile:

in Windows, try this in Win10.

Settings > System > Display > scroll down to Advanced display settings > Display adaptor properties for Display,  (this page was hidden behind the Advanced display settings page on my computer, I had to minimize the front page to see it)  > Color Management > Profiles associated with this device.  Yours may be blank because none have been created.

 

On a Mac: System Preferences > Display > Color

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