ACADuser

Framing a roof over?

Recommended Posts

It really does not take that long to model 3D Solids in Chief,  just be sure you cover your bases in 2D as well.  Then you can decide when to use and when not to use 3D Solid modeling techniques.  I do hear what Larry is saying though regard where one choses to invest their time.  I for one do actually like the modeling process, and the finished product as well.

 

The best solution I have found is to use other Solid modeling programs that are much better at this than Chief then import a symbol and even the 2D drawings if needed.  Again, to each his own.  Good luck.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

HumbleChief has the correct thought process. Don't fight perfection where it's not needed. We all have our moments of WTF am I going to do!!!!! That's when we ask for help and I often work on tiny issues because I WANT TO KNOW why.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Rod I took from you plan & tried to use in mine but fell short as I needed to extend the plate and add 2 more rafters.

But I can not figure out how to edit your objects.

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks all for all the interest in the thread.

 

I just thought that with automated software you could do things automatically.  Not. :(

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks all for all the interest in the thread.

 

I just thought that with automated software you could do things automatically.  Not. :(

You didn't really think you could do EVERYTHING automatically did you? :)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The model I posted does have the valley plates above the roof sheathing.  If a person wanted to go that far you could model the sheathing and even provide subtractions for cutaways or whatever........

 

Edit:

 

I recently had a project where the 2D plans where very clear that the roof sheathing was to continue under the overbuilt section in order to provide the required shear the engineer requested.  I even spoke with the framer and explained why it needed to be done this way.

 

He said something about how he already knew how to do this as I was leaving.  Myself, the engineer, and the GC just finished working out the additional shear panels required to fix the issues his method created.

 

Rod, I must be a little dense today. I'm not sure I follow you on your above comment. Are you saying you "left" the existing sheathing and overlaid the 2x valley on top of the existing, or that you "removed" the existing sheathing and placed the 2x valley directly on top of the rafters. We always leave the existing sheathing. I'm sure it is just me but I didn't follow your comment.

 

Thanks, Mike

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Rod, I must be a little dense today. I'm not sure I follow you on your above comment. Are you saying you "left" the existing sheathing and overlaid the 2x valley on top of the existing, or that you "removed" the existing sheathing and placed the 2x valley directly on top of the rafters. We always leave the existing sheathing. I'm sure it is just me but I didn't follow your comment.

 

Thanks, Mike

We always leave the existing sheathing and shear edge nail it at the existing wall or beam.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks, Perry. I just didn't follow his comments about, "Myself, the engineer, and the GC just finished working out the additional shear panels required to fix the issues his method created."

 

Mike

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Mike

 

What I intended to say was that I did in fact leave a space for the sheathing as would be expected.  I just did not show it in the first pic.  A latter response shows the sheathing in position as would be expected.

 

Since the roof diaphram was not constructed as the engineer requested and the plans detailed.  We then had to get together and figure out how to construct additional shear panels in order to meet the requirements of the design.

 

Sorry about that, been working late a lot lately, probably not as clear as it could have been.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Rod I took from you plan & tried to use in mine but fell short as I needed to extend the plate and add 2 more rafters.

But I can not figure out how to edit your objects.

 

You are exactly right about not being able to extend Solids once they become shapes.  The trick is to leave them a little long in the first place and then be very careful with where you chose to place your subtractions.

 

I use a Solid Box the size of the valley plate stock and then rotate it upward to match the angle of the pitch of the roof.  Rotating it to align with the valley boards is the tough part, no make parrallel tool available.  BTW you can still extend the box after it is raised into position above the roof sheathing, just not after a subtraction has been performed on it.

 

Hope that is helpful.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

We call it a California Fill.  I came from Texas,  and we had these tie-ins there,  we never called it a California Tie in back there.  I always thought it was funny that we here in California call it a California Tie In or California Fill......  as if we here in California invented this........  hmmmm,  we probably did invent this come to think of it.

Well up here in NorCal we call it California Frame.  Anyone who comes from out of state hates it.  I come across this all the time since I mainly do additions and remodels.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

If you don't use the California fill then every hip and valley becomes a bearing beam. Saves money to do it.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Please sign in to comment

You will be able to leave a comment after signing in



Sign In Now

  • Member Statistics

    27617
    Total Members
    6254
    Most Online
    zzubin
    Newest Member
    zzubin
    Joined