EconBlueprints

Is Buying A Different Program The Best Way To Draw Dormers?

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2 hours ago, Kbird1 said:

 

Exactly....when I am looking at 1st Floor Framing , I don't "see" the Plywood , and I am not sure which Builder would consider the 1st Floor Framing to be part of the Foundation? at least not me.... :) , I have never headed to the basement to look up at the Floor Framing...... but everyone "thinks" differently right so.....

 

M.

Came up as a contractor and started using CA as a hobby in version 7

It only makes sense that framing is on the fnd layer, how else would you be able to truly decipher the floor to fnd connections...is it a ledger detail, a flush GH detail, a stem wall with rims, a slab w/ curb abutting a stem wall w/ joists...that information must be graphically represented with fnd and framing on 1 sheet...I see no other way, section details only get you so far

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I have always thought it would be more efficient for the foundation crew to install the sill plate when they set the anchor bolts... even if the framers had to remove the plate later to roll out the sill sealer.  At least the anchor bolts would be set to the proper height and we could actually have anchor bolts within a foot of the end of the plates.  

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On 3/29/2019 at 10:03 AM, Kbird1 said:

Exactly....when I am looking at 1st Floor Framing , I don't "see" the Plywood , and I am not sure which Builder would consider the 1st Floor Framing to be part of the Foundation? at least not me.... :) , I have never headed to the basement to look up at the Floor Framing...... but everyone "thinks" differently right so.....

 

Here's another way to think about it regardless of whether or not you think its logical to display the floor framing along with the wall system they are bearing on...

 

For all intents and purposes, each floor has walls, a floor, and a ceiling right?  What we want to avoid is showing multiple floor/ceiling structures on the same page, so, for the sake of clarity (and logicality in my opinion), Foundation level gets the first floor structure, First Floor level gets the 2nd floor structure, and top floor gets the roof structure.  Every level gets one set of walls and one platform.

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28 minutes ago, Alaskan_Son said:

 

Here's another way to think about it regardless of whether or not you think its logical to display the floor framing along with the wall system they are bearing on...

 

For all intents and purposes, each floor has walls, a floor, and a ceiling right?  What we want to avoid is showing multiple floor/ceiling structures on the same page, so, for the sake of clarity (and logicality in my opinion), Foundation level gets the first floor structure, First Floor level gets the 2nd floor structure, and top floor gets the roof structure.  Every level gets one set of walls and one platform.

 

This makes perfect sense,  you are looking at walls and you want to see the floor load from above to understand the loads on the headers of the openings.

 

It is all about easily understand loads from above.,

 

Discussion over....  let's watch golf.

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21 hours ago, dshall said:

 

This makes perfect sense,  you are looking at walls and you want to see the floor load from above to understand the loads on the headers of the openings.

 

It is all about easily understand loads from above.,

 

Discussion over....  let's watch golf.

 

I am a bit surprised to see all the comments about my offhand remark about "how I think" and perceive things in CA , I do understand the hows and why's it is done the way it is, I just can't seem to remember that I need to be on level 0 to see the 1st floor Framing ......it always seems to be an "oh yeah" moment each time I display floor framing and nothing appears :)

 

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3 hours ago, Kbird1 said:

 

... about "how I think" and perceive things in CA .....

 

I missed that....  I sometimes think like that too... 

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On 3/29/2019 at 3:25 PM, parkwest said:

I have always thought it would be more efficient for the foundation crew to install the sill plate when they set the anchor bolts... even if the framers had to remove the plate later to roll out the sill sealer.  At least the anchor bolts would be set to the proper height and we could actually have anchor bolts within a foot of the end of the plates.  

This is what https://www.strongtie.com/anchorholders_anchorbolts/am_holder/p/anchormate is for. If there were a 2x6 or 3x6 mudsill in place prior to the pour, with a standard 8" foundation wall, you would be pouring concrete into a 2-1/2" slot, and make it harder for the concrete folks to trowel the top of the foundation wall. 

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On 3/28/2019 at 4:00 PM, EconBlueprints said:

          By the way, after building hundreds and hundreds of homes, having done who knows how many blueprints, having been to see a gazillion building inspectors....I still have not found one single person that considers a mud sill to be part of the foundation.  It is and always has been part of the framing.  Only Chief thinks a Mud Sill is part of the foundation.

Do you know where mudsills are specified in the building code? That's right -- the FOUNDATION section. So, I'd have to say that at least a few people (and code-wise, should be everyone) consider mudsills to be part of the foundation. 

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6 hours ago, Richard_Morrison said:

This is what https://www.strongtie.com/anchorholders_anchorbolts/am_holder/p/anchormate is for. If there were a 2x6 or 3x6 mudsill in place prior to the pour, with a standard 8" foundation wall, you would be pouring concrete into a 2-1/2" slot, and make it harder for the concrete folks to trowel the top of the foundation wall. 

 

We didn’t have those anchor holders back in the 70’s when I worked for a foundation company... I was thinking about placing the mudsills with the anchor bolts after the top had been troweled... you could stack all the sill plates, layout and drill mass production wise...

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2 hours ago, parkwest said:

 

We didn’t have those anchor holders back in the 70’s when I worked for a foundation company... I was thinking about placing the mudsills with the anchor bolts after the top had been troweled... you could stack all the sill plates, layout and drill mass production wise...

This is not really much different than the "stab and jab" approach that many contractors take with bolts placed after the concrete is poured, except that you couldn't really see if the bolts were fully embedded since the mudsill would block your view. Stab & jab is also a good recipe for a cone of laitance, which reduces the structural strength of the anchor bolts in pullout. 

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On ‎3‎/‎31‎/‎2019 at 2:32 PM, Richard_Morrison said:

This is what https://www.strongtie.com/anchorholders_anchorbolts/am_holder/p/anchormate is for. If there were a 2x6 or 3x6 mudsill in place prior to the pour, with a standard 8" foundation wall, you would be pouring concrete into a 2-1/2" slot, and make it harder for the concrete folks to trowel the top of the foundation wall. 

Back in the 70's when 2x decking floors were predominate we did install the mudsill and pour into that 2-1/2" slot, and it was a pain you couldn't be any drier than a 5" slump.  Troweling the top of a foundation was not an issue - getting concrete spudded under the plate was another matter.  I do not miss those days.

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So I'm curious, "Is Buying A Different Program The Best Way To Draw Dormers?" Just askin'...

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20 hours ago, Richard_Morrison said:

This is not really much different than the "stab and jab" approach that many contractors take with bolts placed after the concrete is poured, except that you couldn't really see if the bolts were fully embedded since the mudsill would block your view. Stab & jab is also a good recipe for a cone of laitance, which reduces the structural strength of the anchor bolts in pullout. 

 

Yep!  It’s a miracle that the human race has survived....  with all these older homes just slipping off the foundations everyday due to lactating anchor bolts placed into the concrete by mere mortals.

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This is a great conversation. Imported dormers, seeing floor joists through plywood, using a spud bar as a trowel, lactating anchor bolts... I could go on.

 

But we have it too easy. According to my father-in-law, in the 50s foundations were poured by wheelbarrowing concrete from the street, up a ramp crossing the overdig onto and around the 2x6 catwalk, then dumped into the plywood forms they built. (Wow. I think I would've found other work.) And of course all those homes were uphill from the street, and had 1/4 mile long driveways.

 

Amazingly, a few of those homes are still standing. :P

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14 hours ago, parkwest said:

 

Yep!  It’s a miracle that the human race has survived....  with all these older homes just slipping off the foundations everyday due to lactating anchor bolts placed into the concrete by mere mortals.

The first photo happened about 10 miles from here 30 years ago, along with many other homes. Probably built by a contractor with your same attitude. High winds can have a similar effect, as the second photo shows. The human race will survive poor building practices, but many individuals don't.

 

LPQUAKE_FILE3.jpg

download.jpg

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I'm surprised at the number of posts on this thread.  The OP posted about dormers right?

 

You just can never know what post topic will inspire such discussion....amazing. 

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7 hours ago, Richard_Morrison said:

download.jpg

 

I think there was more wrong with that house than just lactating anchor bolts. :lol:

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What a great thread, but we need to get back on topic. ;)

Just finished the pour for our duplex garage. We used the

AnchorMates to good effect. Another downside to "stab and

jab" is that hopefully there is some rebar in there that can

get in the way. I had my guys tie the anchor bolts together

with a length of rebar. If this garage blows over it's gonna

take the foundation with it. :)  

 

Here's a fuzzy shot getting laid out for the pour.  

Anchormate.png

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